Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Two UT Southwestern Scientists Earn Spots on Top 20 List

Published: Saturday, February 01, 2014
Last Updated: Friday, January 31, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Dr. Eric Olson and Dr. Philip Thomas earn spots in translational research.

Two UT Southwestern Medical Center investigators have earned spots on a list of Top 20 Translational Researchers created by the Nature Publishing Group’s Bioentrepreneur, a web portal for readers interested in commercialization of advances in science.

Dr. Eric Olson, Chair of Molecular Biology, placed sixth on the list, while Dr. Philip Thomas, Professor of Physiology, was 16th among the top 20 for 2012, the latest year announced.

“We are delighted with this recognition,” said Dr. David Russell, Vice Provost and Dean of Basic Research. “Dr. Olson’s studies in heart development and Dr. Thomas’ analysis of unfolded proteins in human disease are paradigms of medically relevant and commercially applicable research.”

Analytics used to compile the list included the number of patents linked to corresponding authors and the studies’ institutional affiliations, according to the site. Patents are frequently used as a measure of commercialization activity, and they are critical to the mission of the Office of Technology Development to develop UT Southwestern inventions to benefit humankind.

In 2013, Dr. Olson was awarded the March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology for discovering an astonishing number of genes and regulatory pathways governing the development and growth of the cardiovascular system, leading to novel concepts and therapies to treat heart disease in children and adults. That followed the 2012 Passano Award, which recognized his identification of major genetic pathways controlling the development of the heart and other muscles.

A member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Dr. Olson directs UT Southwestern’s Nancy B. and Jake L. Hamon Center for Basic Research in Cancer.

Dr. Thomas’ research focuses on the folding, structure, and function of integral membrane proteins and their misfolding as the basis of human disease. More than a decade ago, Dr. Thomas discovered that protein folding is disrupted in cystic fibrosis, a serious, chronic genetic condition that affects breathing and digestion. His laboratory also developed a novel way to monitor the disease process inside cells.

Dr. Thomas was senior author of a 2012 study published in Cell that used a novel technique to determine that the most common cystic fibrosis mutation actually impacts two different cellular processes, which explained why current treatments are only partially effective. The study also suggested ways to identify new treatments that deliver a one-two punch against both defective processes.

Nature Biotechnology created a list of highest-ranking institutions by proportion of studies selected by SciBX during 2012. Considering about 200 articles from 102 institutions that had more than four studies highlighted during the year, the journal placed UT Southwestern fourth.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,900+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

HIV Protein Manipulates Hundreds of Human Genes
Findings search for new or improved treatments for patients with AIDS.
Thursday, January 28, 2016
UT Southwestern Scientists Synthesize Nanoparticles
Synthetic nanoparticles to deliver tumor-suppressing therapies to damaged livers.
Wednesday, January 27, 2016
Tumor-suppressing Gene Works by Restraining Mobile Genetic Elements
Findings from the study leads to new ways of diagnosing and treating cancer.
Saturday, January 23, 2016
UTSW Researchers Identifies How Drugs Alter Pancreatic Cancer Cells
The findings were published in Cell Reports.
Friday, January 22, 2016
Researchers Identify Process that Causes Chronic Neonatal Lung Disease
Study determines how the NLRP3 inflammasome activates the protein Interleukin 1 beta.
Saturday, January 16, 2016
Researchers Find a Small Protein that Plays a Big Role in Heart Muscle Contraction
New protein, DWORF, stimulates a calcium-ion pump that controls muscle contraction.
Friday, January 15, 2016
Gene-editing Technique Successfully Stops Progression of DMD
CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing to correct the mutation in the germ line of mice and prevent muscular dystrophy.
Friday, January 01, 2016
UT Southwestern Scientists Discover a New Role for RNA
Safeguarding chromosome number in human cells, with implications for cancer biology.
Wednesday, December 30, 2015
Scientists Detect Inherited Traits Tied to Sleep and Wake Associated with Severe Bipolar Disorder
Study provides targets for new approaches to prevent and treat bipolar disorder.
Wednesday, December 30, 2015
UT Southwestern Scientist Honored as Rising Star in Texas Research
Dr. Joshua Mendell selected as the recipient of the 2016 Edith and Peter O’Donnell Award in Medicine.
Saturday, December 12, 2015
UTSW-led Study Establishes Biomarkers to Help Diagnose, Treat Psychosis
In this study, the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes identified three neurobiologically distinct biotypes.
Saturday, December 12, 2015
Enzyme Involved in Cell Division Also Plays a Role in Inflammation
NEK7 enzyme’s switch-like activity in immunity lead to new treatments for a variety of medical conditions linked to inflammation.
Thursday, December 10, 2015
Research Finding Could Lead to Targeted Therapies for IBD
Findings published online in Cell Reports.
Tuesday, December 01, 2015
UT Southwestern Geneticist Receives Breakthrough Prize
Dr. Helen H. Hobbs receives prestigious Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences.
Saturday, November 28, 2015
CRI Identifies Emergency Blood-formation Response
Researchers report that when tissue damage occurs, an emergency blood-formation system activates.
Friday, November 20, 2015
Scientific News
Natural Protein Points to New Inflammation Treatment
Findings may offer insight to effective treatments for inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and multiple sclerosis.
Genetic Cause of Rare Allergy
Institute has identified a genetic mutation responsible for a rare form of inherited hives induced by vibratory urticaria.
Battery Component Found to Harm Key Soil Microorganism
The material at the heart of the lithium ion batteries that power electric vehicles, laptop computers and smartphones has been shown to impair a key soil bacterium, according to new research.
Keeping Tumor Growth at Bay
Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis found a way to keep a cancerous tumor from growing by using nanoparticles of the main ingredient in common antacid tablets.
Natural Protein Points to New Inflammation Treatment
Findings may offer insight to effective treatments for inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and multiple sclerosis.
Mitochondria Shown to Trigger Cell Ageing
An international team of scientists has for the first time shown that mitochondria, the batteries of the cells, are essential for ageing.
Cancer Cells Kill Off Healthy Neighbours
Cancer cells create space to grow by killing off surrounding healthy cells, according to UK researchers working with fruit flies.
Validating the Accuracy of CRISPR-Cas9
IBS Researchers create multiplex Digenome-seq to find errors in CRISPR-Cas9 processes.
Cancer Drug Target Visualized at Atomic Resolution
New study using cryo-electron microscopy shows how potential drugs could inhibit cancer.
Genetic Mechanism Behind Cancer-Causing Mutations
Researchers at Indiana University has identified a genetic mechanism that is likely to drive mutations that can lead to cancer.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,900+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,200+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!