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Interpack 2014: Sterile and Ready to Use Packaging by SCHOTT

Published: Thursday, May 08, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, May 08, 2014
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SCHOTT’s sterile, ready to use vials adaptiQ™ will be on display at Interpack.

At Interpack 2014, SCHOTT will be demonstrating how close cooperation with leading machine manufacturers such as Bausch+Stroebel, Bosch Packaging Technology and OPTIMA can culminate in flexible, new packaging solutions.

SCHOTT discusses its innovative product ideas with these machine manufacturers already during the development phase. The mutual customers - pharmaceutical companies - therefore benefit from an integrated, highly efficient filling process in which the primary packaging and filling lines are perfectly tuned to each other.

With the sterile, ready to use vials adaptiQ™ that will be on display at Interpack, the partners will be catering to one of the most important trends in the pharmaceutical industry: flexible manufacturing strategies that allow for different substance-packaging configurations to be filled efficiently.

adaptiQ will be on exhibit at SCHOTT’s booth (hall 7a, B01) and its partners’ booths at Interpack. The system consists of a so-called nest and tub configuration in which up to 100 ready to use pharmaceutical vials are securely fixed inside the nest in sterile packaging for delivery to the pharmaceutical companies. They can then fill the vials immediately on their filling lines without having to wash or sterilize them first. In fact, they can even fill them on the lines that are normally used to fill nested syringes.

In order to keep the set-up times for changing packaging as short as possible, adaptiQ is orientated towards the proven tub format used in syringe manufacturing. This means pharmaceutical companies can use the same production line for various types of containers and formats after making only minor adjustments.

Although it is embedded in a standard tub, the SCHOTT adaptiQ solution features a nest design that offers advantages over all of the other ready-to-use solutions commonly available today: The vials are held by the neck in the adaptiQ nest and can be lifted or pulled out together inside the nest, to weigh or close them, for example.

Furthermore, the bottom is freely accessible and this ensures just the right temperature transition during lyophilization in particular. For the first time ever, all of the process steps can be performed without having to remove the vials from the nest.

SCHOTT will offer adaptiQ in the common 2R and 4R ISO formats to start with at the end of 2014. The company is already preparing to expand its portfolio rather quickly.

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