Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Microfluidic-based Point of Care is Now a Must-have for Diagnostic Companies

Published: Saturday, May 17, 2014
Last Updated: Saturday, May 17, 2014
Bookmark and Share
“Point of Care Testing 2014: Applications for Microfluidic Technologies” report from Yole Développement.

“Diagnostic companies confirm the adoption of microfluidic technologies for point of care testing”, announces Dr Benjamin Roussel, Activity Leader, Medical Technologies, from Yole Développement.

Indeed the point of care market’s contribution to in vitro diagnostic is poised to increase from 13% to 17% over the next five years, leading to a market of around $30B in 2019. Under this context, the French consulting company, Yole Développement releases its report, “Point of Care Testing 2014: Applications for Microfluidic Technologies”.

This technology and market study provides an in-depth analysis of microfluidic devices dedicated to point of care; including nearly 60 new technologies, commercialized or close to the market, Yole
Développement’s report also proposes an innovative market segmentation combined with market forecasts.

This analysis includes the following applications: emergency testing - home tests - doctor’s office screening - decentralized hospital tests - environmental testing - Forensic and military - third-world infections - agro-food.

“Different types of point of care tests are available on the market. Whereas simple lateral flow tests work perfectly without fluid management technology, microfluidics is necessary when test complexity increases”, explains Benjamin from Yole Développement. Indeed, microfluidics is an enabling technology allowing miniaturization and integration of laboratory protocols into portable devices.

Point of care testing based on microfluidic technology is expected to grow sharply, from $1.6B in 2013 to $5.6B in 2019, at a CAGR 2014 - 2019 of 23%. Major diagnostics companies (Alere, Abbott Point of Care, BD Diagnostics, Cepheid, Abaxis, etc.) have realized the potential of rapid molecular diagnostic testing. Indeed, several successful point of care products based on microfluidic technology have been launched in the past few years.

Access to microfluidic technologies for diagnostic companies often passes through acquisitions, as this reduces the technology development risk and increases reactivity. The most recent acquisition was that of IQuum by Roche for $275M in April 2014.

In its new report, Yole Développement describes how mergers and acquisitions will decrease in volume but increase in value. Based on a complete analysis of the last three years’ developments, the company has been able to draw effective conclusions.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,400+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Releasing Cancer Cells for Better Analysis
A new device developed at the University of Michigan could provide a non-invasive way to monitor the progress of an advanced cancer treatment.
Releasing Cancer Cells for Better Analysis
A new device developed at the University of Michigan could provide a non-invasive way to monitor the progress of an advanced cancer treatment.
Apricot Kernels Pose Risk of Cyanide Poisoning
Eating more than three small raw apricot kernels, or less than half of one large kernel, in a serving can exceed safe levels. Toddlers consuming even one small apricot kernel risk being over the safe level.
Cell Transplant Treats Parkinson’s in Mice
A University of Wisconsin—Madison neuroscientist has inserted a genetic switch into nerve cells so a patient can alter their activity by taking designer drugs that would not affect any other cell.
Understanding Female HIV Transmission
Glowing virus maps points of entry through entire female reproductive tract for first time.
Genetic Markers Influence Addiction
Differences in vulnerability to cocaine addiction and relapse linked to both inherited traits and epigenetics, U-M researchers find.
Lab-on-a-Chip for Detecting Glucose
By integrating microfluidic chips with fiber optic biosensors, researchers in China are creating ultrasensitive lab-on-a-chip devices to detect glucose levels.
A lncRNA Regulates Repair of DNA Breaks in Breast Cancer Cells
Findings give "new insight" into biology of tough-to-treat breast cancer.
COPD Linked to Increased Bacterial Invasion
Persistent inflammation in COPD may result from a defect in the immune system that allows airway bacteria to invade deeper into the lung.
Detection of HPV in First-Void Urine
Similar sensitivity of HPV test on first void urine sample compared to cervical smear.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,400+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!