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Risk of Brain Injury is Genetic

Published: Tuesday, May 20, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, May 20, 2014
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Link between injury to the developing brain and common variation in genes identified.

Premature babies’ risk of brain injury is influenced by their genes, a study suggests.

University researchers have identified a link between injury to the developing brain and common variation in genes associated with schizophrenia and the metabolism of fat.

The study builds on previous research, which has shown that being born prematurely - before 37 weeks - is a leading cause of learning and behavioural difficulties in childhood.


Around half of infants weighing less than 1500g at birth go on to experience difficulties in learning and attention at school age.

Unique collaboration

Scientists at Edinburgh, Imperial College London and King’s College London studied genetic samples and MRI scans of more than 80 premature infants at the time of discharge from hospital.

The tests and scans revealed that variation in the genetic code of genes known as ARVCF and FADS2 influenced the risk of brain injury on MRI in the babies.

Global challenge

Premature births account for 10 per cent of all births worldwide, according to experts.
Earlier research has shown that being born preterm is closely related to abnormal brain development and poor neurodevelopmental outcome.

However, scientists say that they do not fully understand the processes that lead to these problems in some infants.

Researchers add that future studies could look at how changes in these genes may bring about this risk of - or resilience - to brain injury.



 
 
 


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