Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Scientists Identify Link Between Stem Cell Regulation and the Development of Lung Cancer

Published: Tuesday, June 24, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, June 24, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Study explains how factors that regulate the growth of adult stem cells lead to the formation of precancerous lesions.

UCLA researchers led by Dr. Brigitte Gomperts have discovered the inner workings of the process thought to be the first stage in the development of lung cancer. Their study explains how factors that regulate the growth of adult stem cells that repair tissue in the lungs can lead to the formation of precancerous lesions.

Findings from the three-year study could eventually lead to new personalized treatments for lung cancer, which is responsible for an estimated 29 percent of U.S. cancer deaths, making it the deadliest form of the disease.

The study was published online June 19 in the journal Stem Cell. Gomperts, a member of the UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research and the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, collaborated with Manash Paul and Bharti Bisht, postdoctoral scholars and co-lead authors of the study.

Adult stem cells in lung airways are present specifically to repair the airways after injury or disease caused by smoking, pollution, viruses or other factors. Gomperts and her team found that this reparative process is tightly regulated by molecules called reactive oxygen species, or ROS.

Recent research has shown that low levels of ROS are important for signaling the stem cells to perform important functions - such as repairing tissue damage - while high levels of ROS can cause stem cells to die. But the level of ROS needed for repair to be initiated has remained a subject of debate among researchers.

The UCLA study found that the dynamic flux of ROS from low to moderate levels in the airway stem cells is what drives the repair process, and that the increase in ROS levels in the repairing cell is quickly reduced to low levels to prevent excessive cell proliferation.

Gomperts' lab found that disrupting this normal regulation of ROS back to low levels is equivalent to pulling the brakes off of the stem cells: They will continue to make too many of themselves, which causes the cells not to mature and instead become precancerous lesions. Subsequent progressive genetic changes to the cells in these lesions over time can eventually allow cancerous tumors to form.

"Low ROS is what keeps stem cells primed so that your body is poised and ready to respond to injury and repair," said Gomperts, who also is an associate professor in the department of pediatrics at UCLA. "Loss of this ROS regulation leads to precancerous lesions. Now, with this precancerous model in place, we can begin looking for what we call 'driver mutations,' or those specific changes that take the precancerous lesions to full-blown cancer."

Gomperts said that because many different factors - including cigarette smoke, smog and inflammation - could potentially trigger an increase in ROS in the airway stem cells, researchers might eventually be able to customize treatments based on the cause. "There are likely multiple ways for a person to get to a precancerous lesion, so the process could be different among different groups of people. Imagine a personalized way to identify what pathways have gone wrong in a patient, so that we could target a therapy to that individual."

The research's ultimate goal is to develop a targeted strategy to prevent pre-malignant lesions from forming by targeting the biology of these lesions and therefore preventing lung cancer from developing.

"Our study is important because it sheds light on how lung cancer can form, and this will hopefully lead to new therapies for this terrible disease," Paul said.

The UCLA study also is noteworthy for finally identifying specifically how ROS affects the proliferation of stem cells.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,300+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,900+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Microchip Tech Improves Nanomaterial Safety Screening
Platform developed at UCLA uses lab-on-a-chip technology to predict how hazardous engineered nanomaterials might be.
Tuesday, August 16, 2016
Three-Drug Combinations Counter Antibiotic Resistance
Research shows that combinations of three different antibiotics can treat resistant bacteria, even if they are ineffective independently.
Friday, July 22, 2016
Researchers Identify Protein That Could Prevent Tumor Growth
Researchers at UCLA have identified a protein that has the potential to prevent the growth of cervical cancer cells. The discovery could lead to the development of new treatments for the deadly disease.
Friday, June 03, 2016
Unravelling the Genetic Evolution of Zika Virus
Study traces how a largely unfamiliar pathogen led to a global epidemic.
Monday, April 18, 2016
Nanoparticle Delivery Maximizes Drug Defense Against Bioterrorism Agent
UCLA team develops method for improving drug’s efficacy while reducing side effects.
Saturday, November 07, 2015
Study Finds Link Between Neural Stem Cell Overgrowth and Autism-like Behavior in Mice
UCLA researchers demonstrates how, in pregnant mice, inflammation can trigger an excessive division of neural stem cells.
Tuesday, October 14, 2014
UCLA Awarded $7 Million to Unravel Mystery Genetic Diseases
UCLA tackle difficult-to-solve medical cases and develop ways to diagnose rare genetic disorders.
Friday, July 04, 2014
Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease Advances Toward Clinical Trials
Gene therapy technique is scheduled to begin clinical trials by early 2014.
Tuesday, July 02, 2013
Rigid Growth Matrix: A Key to Success of Cardiac Tissue Engineering
UCLA team found that rigid matrices promotes the generation of more cardiomyocytes cells from ES cells.
Monday, April 15, 2013
Cells Derived from Pluripotent Stem Cells may Pose Challenges for Clinical Use
UCLA researchers have found that three types of cells derived from hES cells and from iPS cells are similar to each other.
Tuesday, August 23, 2011
UCLA Scientists Find Molecular Switch to Prevent Huntington's Disease in Mice
Finding suggests new approach for treating devastating disorder.
Tuesday, December 29, 2009
UCLA Scientists Develop 'Crystal Ball' for Personalized Cancer Treatment
New tool predicts how a chemotherapy drug will work on individual tumors to pinpoint the effective treatment.
Friday, February 06, 2009
Scientists Reprogram Induced Pluripotent Cells into Precursors of Eggs, Sperm
The findings from UCLA researchers can possibly open the door for new treatments for infertility using patient-specific cells.
Wednesday, February 04, 2009
Scientists at UCLA Reprogram Human Skin Cells into Embryonic Stem Cells
UCLA stem cell scientists have reprogrammed human skin cells into cells with the same unlimited properties as embryonic stem cells, without using embryos or eggs.
Tuesday, February 12, 2008
Using Nanotechnology, UCLA Researchers Discover that Cancer Cells "Feel" Much Softer than Normal Cells
UCLA scientists have differentiated metastatic cancer cells from normal cells in patient samples using nanotechnology that measures the softness of the cells.
Tuesday, December 04, 2007
Scientific News
Shedding Light on HIV Vaccine Design
Broadly speaking - Mathematical modelling of host-pathogen coevolution sheds light on HIV vaccine design.
AACC 2016 Sees Clinical Chemistry Labs Drive Precision Medicine Offerings
Biomarker assays to enable precision medicine and risk assessment, mass spec-based tests designed for use in clinical labs large and small, and liquid biopsy technology captured the spotlight at the AACC annual meeting.
Automated Patch Clamping Trends
Learn more about current practices, preferences and metrics in ion channel drug screening using APC technology.
Oxygen Can Impair Cancer Immunotherapy in Mice
Researchers at NIH have discovered that the T cells contain a group of oxygen-sensing proteins which act to limit inflammation within the lungs.
Lab-on-a-Stick: Miniaturised Clinical Testing For Fast Detection Of Antibiotic Resistance
A portable power-free test for the rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has been developed by academics at Loughborough University and the University of Reading.
Genetic Ancestry of Cultivated Strawberry Unravelled
UNH scientists constructed a linkage map of the seven chromosomes of the diploid Fragaria iinumae, which allows them to fill in a piece of the genetic puzzle about the eight sets of chromosomes of the cultivated strawberry.
Progress In Vaccination Against Vespid Venom
Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University Munich have presented a method which facilitates a personalised procedure for wasp allergy sufferers.
New Drug Target for Inflammatory Disorders
Penn study finds enigmatic molecules maintain equilibrium between fighting infection and inflammatory havoc.
Emerging Model of Cancer
Cancer acts cooperatively, making individual decisions but acting in unison; this insight is being used to create a computer model of cancer.
Biological Barcodes Using CRISPR
Using genome editing tools, researchers are getting closer to understand differentiation of various cell types during development.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,300+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,900+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!