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Consistent & Efficient Purification of NGS Library Reactions

Published: Tuesday, June 24, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, June 24, 2014
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MagSi-NGSPREP offers an efficient solution for DNA clean-up and size selection.

AMSBIO has announced MagSi-NGSPREP- a magnetic bead based tool that offers an efficient solution for DNA clean-up and size selection in Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) applications. MagSi-NGSPREP supports all standard DNA clean-up protocols encountered during Next-Gen library preparation, including the classical one-sided and two-sided "solid phase reversible immobilization" (SPRI) size selection protocols.

The simple and flexible protocols employed using MagSi-NGSPREP can be adjusted to users specific application and NGS platform. MagSi-NGSPREP can be used manually but is also easy to automate for high-throughput processing.

Using MagSi-NGSPREP, DNA fragments are bound directly onto the surface of the magnetic beads, leaving unincorporated nucleotides, primers, primer dimers, and other contaminants in solution. Following this the DNA fragments are eluted with low salt buffer or reagent grade water.

The technology for binding of DNA fragments onto the applied magnetic nanoparticle surface does not require use of any hazardous chaotropic buffers. The purification protocols are optimized to provide high yield and purity of the recovered DNA fragments.

MagSi-NGSPREP allows selective binding of DNA with a size cut-off between 100bp and 1kb with specific reagent volume: sample volume ratios. By increasing the volume of MagSi-NGSPREP, the efficiency of binding smaller fragments increases. This enables the user to selectively keep or discard undesired fragment sizes.

Depending on which protocol is used, total preparation time using MagSi-NGSPREP is only 20-30 minutes and the hands-on time necessary for the whole procedure is reduced to a minimum. The kit is stable for 1 year when stored at 2-8°C.

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