Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Understanding the Spread of the Ash Dieback.

Published: Wednesday, July 16, 2014
Last Updated: Wednesday, July 16, 2014
Bookmark and Share
The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) has released new genetic data that will help understand the epidemic, across Europe and the UK.

As part of the NORNEX consortium , TGAC has sequenced 20 genomes of the fungus (Hymenoscyphus fraxineus) responsible for the spread of the ash dieback epidemic that threatens our third most common broadleaf tree (after oak and birch). The data is available for analysis on the crowdsourcing site OpenAshDieBack .

These 20 samples come from across the UK (supplied by The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera)); our analysis of the differences between them will help us to understand the characteristics associated with the spread of this devastating disease across Europe and the UK. TGAC's data from these samples will be combined with genomes sequenced from across Europe at The University of Edinburgh, along with further genomes from Japan sequenced at TGAC in collaboration with The Sainsbury Laboratory.

TGAC first sequenced the genome of this ash dieback fungus in 2012 using a sample from Norfolk isolated by scientists at the John Innes Centre. The epidemic has spread across Europe after first being identified in Poland, in 1992. Infection by the fungus has now been detected across many sites in the UK. The isolation and analysis of the fungi has been driven by a funding initiative from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) in partnership with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) to help tackle this major tree disease.

Matt Clark,  Plant and Microbial Genomics  Group Leader, said: "To understand how the Ash Dieback disease will affect the UK, and how we can combat it, we have to understand the pathogen varieties present in the UK. These samples give us important insights into how the fungus could infect different varieties of Ash trees, and respond to treatments such as fungicides."

Mark McMullan, Population Genomicist in the Plant and Microbial Genomics team at TGAC, said: "Sequencing the genome of the pathogen for the first time back in 2012 was an important first step in the process of understanding its evolution in the context of other species of fungi. However, important new information such as the identification of genes associated with the spread of infection can be obtained by understanding the genetic variation between different isolates."

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Hot Processor Speeds Up UK Genome Analysis
The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) is the first Institute in the UK to deploy a new bioinformatics processor called DRAGEN™, which dramatically reduces genomic pipeline run times from hours to minutes.
Thursday, October 29, 2015
TGAC ‘Train The Trainer’ Programme Launch: De Novo Assembly With Australia
TGAC’s ‘Train the Trainer’ programme kicked-off with a three-day workshop of interactive and immersive training covering andragogic concepts, training methodologies and expert content on the topic of De novo genome assemblies.
Thursday, September 17, 2015
Changing the Biological Data Visualisation World
Scientists at TGAC, alongside European partners, have created a cutting-edge, open source community for the life sciences.
Friday, September 04, 2015
Accelerating Forage Breeding to Boost Livestock Productivity
International expert skill-sets in genomics and bioinformatics enhance our capacity to breed improved forages for Africa.
Saturday, August 22, 2015
TGAC Leads Development to Diminish Threat to Vietnam’s Most Important Crop
Advanced bioinformatics capabilities for next-generation rice genomics in Vietnam to aid precision breeding.
Tuesday, August 18, 2015
Faster, Better, Cheaper: a New Method to Generate Extended Data for Genome Assemblies
The Genome Analysis Centre have developed a new library construction method for genome sequencing that can simultaneously construct up to 12 size-selected long mate pair (LMP) or ‘jump’ libraries ranging in sizes from 1.7kb to 18kb with reduced DNA input, time and cost.
Thursday, July 23, 2015
Study Reveals Improved Way to Interpret High-Throughput Biological Data
A recent study has revealed a novel workflow, identifying associations between molecules to provide insights into cellular metabolism and gene expression in complex biological systems.
Friday, July 17, 2015
Publishing Open Data in the Plant Sciences
The Genome Analysis Centre hosts the first Collaborative Open Plant Omics (COPO) consortium workshop aiming to understand and manage the sharing and reuse of datasets within plant sciences.
Thursday, July 02, 2015
TGAC Awarded £100k to Combat Sugar Beet Crop Infection in the UK
Sugar production from sugar beet accounts for 20 per cent of the world's supply. Erysiphe betae, a sugar beet powdery mildew can cause sugar yield losses of up to 20 per cent.
Tuesday, June 09, 2015
UK-China Collaboration For Data Sharing In Metabolomics
The European Bioinformatics Institute, The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC), BGI and GigaScience receive funding from BBSRC for a UK-China consortium in metabolomics data sharing.
Monday, May 11, 2015
TGAC’s Take On The First Portable DNA Sequencing ‘Laboratory’
As one of the first research Institutes to take part in the MinION Access Programme for portable DNA sequencing, introduced by Oxford Nanopore Technologies, TGAC’s task force share their experience of the ground breaking trial so far.
Thursday, March 19, 2015
NGS Expert Leads World-Class Institute’s Cutting-Edge Genome Analysis
Dr Daniel Swan joins The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) as Head of Platforms & Pipelines group to lead the research Institute’s suite of advanced genome analysis facilities.
Monday, March 16, 2015
Novel Online Bioinformatics Tool Significantly Reduces Time Of Multiple Genome Analysis
UK research collaboration develops a new bioinformatics pipeline that enables automated primer design for multiple genome species, significantly reducing turnaround time.
Thursday, March 12, 2015
TGAC Receives Advanced NGS Training
TGAC hosted PerkinElmer’s training session, “Advanced Automated NGS Library Preparation” with participants from across Europe to gain hands-on experience in protocols for PerkinElmer’s robot technologies.
Thursday, March 05, 2015
Parasite Provides Clues To Evolution Of Plant Diseases
A new study into the generalist parasite Albugo candida, cause of white rust of brassicas, has revealed key insights into the evolution of plant diseases to aid agriculture and global food security.
Monday, March 02, 2015
Scientific News
High Throughput Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening Assay Trends
Dr John Comley provides an insight into HT MS-based screening with a focus on future user requirements and preferences.
Kitchen Utensils Can Spread Bacteria Between Foods
In a recent study researchers found that produce that contained bacteria would contaminate other produce items through the continued use of knives or graters—the bacteria would latch on to the utensils commonly found in consumers' homes and spread to the next item.
Exploring the Causes of Cancer
Queen's research to understand the regulation of a cell surface protein involved in cancer.
Safer, Faster Way To Remove Pollutants From Water
Using nanoparticles filled with enzymes proves more effective than current methods.
Drug May Prevent Life-Threatening Muscle Loss in Advanced Cancers
New data describes how an experimental drug can stop life-threatening muscle wasting (cachexia) associated with advanced cancers and restore muscle health.
Ancient Viral Molecules Essential for Human Development
Genetic material from ancient viral infections is critical to human development, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Novel Tumor Treatment
In the first published results from a $386,000 National Cancer Institute grant awarded earlier this year, a paper by Scott Verbridge and Rafael Davalos has been published.
Speeding Up the Process of Making Vaccines
System uses a freeze-dry concept to develop "just-add-water" solution.
Chemical Design Made Easier
Rice University scientists prepare elusive organocatalysts for drug and fine chemical synthesis.
New Analysis Technique for Chiral Activity in Molecules
Professor Hyunwoo Kim of the Chemistry Department and his research team have developed a technique that can easily analyze the optical activity of charged compounds by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos