Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Researchers Grow Neural Blood Vessel Cells from Adult Stem Cells

Published: Monday, September 25, 2006
Last Updated: Monday, October 09, 2006
Bookmark and Share
Scientists develop adult stem cells from the blood of an mature animal that were able to be directed into specific cell types.

Scientists have predicted that embryonic stem cells might lead to cures for various diseases and conditions such as heart disease, Parkinson's or spinal cord injuries.

Now, a University of Missouri-Columbia researcher has isolated adult stem cells from blood that can be directed to turn into five types of cells, including bone, blood vessel and nerve cells.

The study is the cover article in the August edition of Stem Cells and Development

"Embryonic stem (ES) cells are able to give rise to the remarkable diversity of cell types that constitute a whole organism such as a human," said Elmer Price, a scientist at the MU Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center and associate professor of biomedical sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine.

"However, this 'pluripotency,' or the ability of the cells to become anything, can also be a curse because ES cells can be misled by biochemical signals when they are transplanted into an adult during cell transplantation experiments."

"This often leads to the generation of unwanted cell types and, on occasion, tumor formation. Because of this, ES cell transplantation can raise serious safety issues."

"In this study, we developed adult stem cells from the blood of an mature animal that were able to be directed into specific cell types such as neurons and blood vessel cells, but they were not as pluripotent as ES cells. We have not observed any evidence of tumor formation."

Price extracted the adult stem cells from pigs' blood. These particular pig cells are unique because the pigs also contained a gene that makes their cells fluorescent.

This allowed Price to track the cells as they developed into nerve or blood vessel cells or upon transplantation.

The fluorescent pigs were created by MU animal scientist Randy Prather, who along with MU researcher Mike Foley, is a co-author of this paper.

In the study, Price was able to develop and sustain adult stem cell lines and then induce them to turn into specific cell types by exposing them to different chemical signals, depending on which type of cell he wanted to develop.

For adult stem cell transplantation therapy, different diseases will require different cell types.

Unlike embryonic stem cells, which are difficult to grow as pure cell populations and can develop into tumor-type tissue, Price's adult stem cells efficiently developed into specific cell types with no abnormal tissue.

"In theory, embryonic stem cells have the ability to become almost any cell type or organ," Price said.

"Very complex chemical signals need to be in place with embryonic stem cells in order for them to develop into the appropriate type of cell."

"However, we have shown that if you can isolate adult stem cells, you can make them generate the appropriate type of cell with much more ease and specificity."

"One day, we may be able to isolate similar adult stem cells from a patient, manipulate the cells in a petri dish, and then re-introduce them back into that same patient as a therapy."

The next step is to determine if enough cells can be produced with Price's method, as well as whether similar cells can be isolated from humans.

"We think that these blood-derived adult stem cells are normally used by the body for regeneration and repair, and we have been able to isolate these cells, grow them in a lab, and direct them toward a specific cell type for eventual therapeutic use," Price said.

"In humans, aging, chronic disease, and a lack of exercise may result in a lowered production of these cells, so it's important to lead a healthy lifestyle to maintain the body's own circulating population of stem cells."

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Researchers Discover A New Mechanism of Proteins to Block HIV
Certain IFITM proteins block and inhibit cell-to-cell transmission of HIV.
Tuesday, September 29, 2015
Scientists Successfully Edit Genes of Dengue Fever Mosquitoes
This research could lead to methods for preventing mosquito-borne diseases.
Monday, September 07, 2015
Unraveling the Elusive Structure of HIV Protein
Snapshots of HIV virus’ proteins may help design new ways to fight the disease.
Monday, July 06, 2015
Key Component in Protein that Causes Cystic Fibrosis Identified
Scientists hope that this finding may lay the foundations for the development of new medications and improved therapies.
Thursday, May 21, 2015
Green Tea Extract and Exercise Hinder Progress of Alzheimer’s
A study led by University of Missouri researchers has determined that a compound found in green tea, and voluntary exercise, slows the progression of the disease in mice and may actually reverse its effects.
Thursday, May 07, 2015
New Transitional Stem Cells Discovered
New stem cells are easier to manipulate, could help future research on reproductive problems.
Friday, April 17, 2015
MU Researchers Discover Protein's Ability To Inhibit HIV Release
TIM-family proteins have the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses.
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
MU Scientists Successfully Transplant, Grow Stem Cells in Pigs
New line of pigs do not reject transplants, will allow for future research on stem cell therapies.
Saturday, June 07, 2014
Stem Cells Successfully Transplanted and Grown in Pigs
New line of pigs do not reject transplants, which will allow for future research on stem cell therapies.
Thursday, June 05, 2014
Adult Stem Cells Could Hold Key to Creating Cure for Type 1 Diabetes
Combining bone marrow cells with new drug restores insulin production.
Tuesday, June 04, 2013
MU Scientists Build Harness for Powerful Radiation Cancer Therapy
Scientists created a gold nanoparticle that can transport powerful radioactive particles directly to tumors for treatment.
Thursday, February 07, 2013
Identical DNA Codes Discovered in six Plant Species safter 32 billion searches
Analyzing massive amounts of data officially became a national priority recently when the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy announced the Big Data Research and Development Initiative. A multi-disciplinary team of University of Missouri researchers rose to the big data challenge when they solved a major biological question by using a groundbreaking computer algorithm to find identical DNA sequences in different plant and animal species.
Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Achieving Coexistence of Biotech, Conventional and Organic Foods in the Marketplace
Meeting at Vancouver, Canada, October 26-28, 2011; GMCC Coexistence Conference
Thursday, April 21, 2011
Gene, Stem Cell Therapy only needs to be 50 Percent Effective to Create a Healthy Heart, MU Researchers Find
Researchers have demonstrated that a muscular dystrophy patient should be able to maintain a normal lifestyle if only 50 percent of the cells of the heart are healthy.
Thursday, November 01, 2007
Scientific News
High Throughput Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening Assay Trends
Dr John Comley provides an insight into HT MS-based screening with a focus on future user requirements and preferences.
How a Genetic Locus Protects Adult Blood-Forming Stem Cells
Mammalian imprinted Gtl2 protects adult hematopoietic stem cells by restricting metabolic activity in the cells' mitochondria.
Genetic Basis of Fatal Flu Side Effect Discovered
A group of people with fatal H1N1 flu died after their viral infections triggered a deadly hyperinflammatory disorder in susceptible individuals with gene mutations linked to the overactive immune response, according to a recent study.
New Tech Vastly Improves CRISPR/Cas9 Accuracy
A new CRISPR/Cas9 technology developed by scientists at UMass Medical School is precise enough to surgically edit DNA at nearly any genomic location, while avoiding potentially harmful off-target changes typically seen in standard CRISPR gene editing techniques.
The MaxSignal Colistin ELISA Test Kit from Bioo Scientific
Kit can help prevent the antibiotic apocalypse by keeping last resort drugs out of the food supply.
"Good" Mozzie Virus Might Hold Key to Fighting Human Disease
Australian scientists have discovered a new virus carried by one of the country’s most common pest mosquitoes.
Non-Disease Proteins Kill Brain Cells
Scientists at the forefront of cutting-edge research into neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s have shown that the mere presence of protein aggregates may be as important as their form and identity in inducing cell death in brain tissue.
Closing the Loop on an HIV Escape Mechanism
Research team finds that protein motions regulate virus infectivity.
New Class of RNA Tumor Suppressors Identified
Two short, “housekeeping” RNA molecules block cancer growth by binding to an important cancer-associated protein called KRAS. More than a quarter of all human cancers are missing these RNAs.
Potential Treatment for Life-Threatening Viral Infections Revealed
The findings point to new therapies for Dengue, West Nile and Ebola.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos