Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Two of the World's Top Geneticists are Coming to Miami

Published: Friday, November 10, 2006
Last Updated: Friday, November 10, 2006
Bookmark and Share
Dr. Margaret Pericak-Vance and Dr. Jeffery Vance of Duke University, are coming to Miami.

Two of the most acclaimed geneticists in the world, Dr. Margaret Pericak-Vance and Dr. Jeffery Vance of Duke University, are bringing their pioneering research into the genetics of a multitude of diseases to Miami.

The Vances' Center for Human Genetics at Duke has uncovered critical clues to the origins of diseases including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, age-related macular degeneration, multiple sclerosis, autism and the muscular dystrophies.

At the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, they will lead a team of investigators that will make up a new Institute of Human Genomics and a proposed Department of Human Genetics.

"The state of Florida is making substantial strides in recruiting some of the very best scientific institutes and centers to our region," said Pascal J. Goldschmidt, M.D., senior vice president for medical affairs and dean of the Miller School.

"A paradigm for this remarkable opportunity for the citizens of Florida is the recruitment of the Center for Human Genetics, led by Margaret and Jeff Vance."

Margaret Pericak-Vance, Ph.D., is director of Duke's Center for Human Genetics, James B. Duke Professor of Medicine, and Chief of the Section of Medical Genetics at Duke University Medical Center.

Her use of novel disease gene mapping led in 1993 to the identification of the major susceptibility gene for Alzheimer's disease apolipoprotein E and very recently to the discovery of a gene that determines risk for developing age-related macular degeneration.

Jeffery Vance, Ph.D., M.D., is the associate director of the Duke Center for Human Genetics, professor of medicine, and director of the Morris K. Udall Parkinson Disease Research Center of Excellence at Duke.

His lab has found and studied genes that contribute to diseases including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, cardiovascular disease, and one of the most common inherited neurological disorders, Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

"Jeff and I love to build things, we love to be creative when we build things, and we like to think outside the box," Pericak-Vance said.

"This is the opportunity to build something truly outstanding and to integrate all of the University of Miami's strengths into one program."

"Genomic medicine is going to change the way we practice medicine from being reactive to being proactive," she said.

"We will discover ways to prevent disease, and we will find better treatments that are based on understanding the complex causes underlying the disorders."

"We have the power now to sort this out and to look at the whole picture."

UM President Donna E. Shalala said the Vances "lead the field of human genetics, particularly as it relates to the common illnesses that all of us are exposed to neurological disorders, heart disease, cancer, vision impairment."

"In Miami they will lead one of the premier institutes for human genomics in the world."

The Duke team includes several other investigators who will also be moving to South Florida.

"We're a very integrated group, we’re multidisciplinary, and we work together on a daily basis," Jeffery Vance said.

"Miami is just a tremendous opportunity to continue to grow, and to begin to translate some of these genes that we're finding into actual practice. That's the ultimate goal."

"The University has two of the best academic leaders in the country: Pascal Goldschmidt and Donna Shalala," he added.

"And there are some terrific researchers in diabetes, spinal cord injury, cancer, eye disease, autism, and many other areas who present real opportunities for collaboration."

Dean Goldschmidt said the Miami genomics institute "will create a formidable opportunity to apply the new knowledge brought out by the Human Genome Project and translate this knowledge in findings that will help our patients survive some of the most deadly diseases."

"They will bring this opportunity not only to all of us at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, but also to everyone involved in biomedical research in South Florida, including Florida International University, Florida Atlantic University, the Scripps Research Institute and many other groups."


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,400+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Fighting Crime Through Crowdsourcing
Researchers are looking at using crowdsourcing to help in facial recognition.
Tuesday, November 18, 2014
Discovery Leads to Simple Blood or Urine Test to Identify Blinding Disease
Breakthrough discovery in diagnosing retinitis pigmentosa, a blinding disease that affects about 1 in 4,000 people in the United States.
Monday, October 21, 2013
Scientific News
Study Finds Brain Chemicals that Keep Wakefulness in Check
Researchers to develop new drugs that promote better sleep, or control hyperactivity in people with mania.
Sorting Through Cellular Statistics
Aaron Dinner, professor in chemistry, and his graduate student Herman Gudjonson are trying to read the manual of life, DNA, as part of the Dinner group’s research into bioinformatics—the application of statistics to biological research.
Playing 'Tag' with Pollution lets Scientists See Who's It
Using a climate model that can tag sources of soot from different global regions and can track where it lands on the Tibetan Plateau, researchers have determined which areas around the plateau contribute the most soot — and where.
Women’s Immune System Genes Operate Differently from Men’s
A new technology reveals that immune system genes switch on and off differently in women and men, and the source of that variation is not primarily in the DNA.
Long Telomeres Associated with Increased Lung Cancer Risk
Genetic predisposition for long telomeres predicts increased lung adenocarcinoma risk.
First Artificial Ribosome Designed
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University have engineered a tethered ribosome that works nearly as well as the authentic cellular component, or organelle, that produces all the proteins and enzymes within the cell.
High-Resolution 3D Images Reveal the Muscle Mitochondrial Power Grid
NIH mouse study overturns scientific ideas on energy distribution in muscle.
Expanding the Brain
A team of researchers has identified more than 40 new “imprinted” genes, in which either the maternal or paternal copy of a gene is expressed while the other is silenced.
Identifying a Key Growth Factor in Cell Proliferation
Researchers discover that aspartate is a limiter of cell proliferation.
Study Uncovers Target for Preventing Huntington’s Disease
Scientists from Cardiff University believe that a treatment to prevent or delay the symptoms of Huntington’s disease could now be much closer, following a major breakthrough.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,400+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!