Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Communities
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Iowa State University Researcher Develops Software that Sidesteps Effects of qPCR-Inhibitory Materials

Published: Wednesday, March 21, 2007
Last Updated: Wednesday, March 21, 2007
Bookmark and Share
The software system PREXCEL-Q can provide a way to detect and avoid inhibition, and enables investigators to consistently design qPCR reactions.

An Iowa State University researcher has developed a Microsoft Excel-based system that provides a way to detect and avoid inhibition, and enables investigators to consistently design dynamically sound, truly LOG-linear qPCR reactions.

PREXCEL-Q was created by Jack Gallup, assistant scientist in veterinary pathology. The description of the invention was published in the Sept. 15, 2006 issue of Biological Procedures On-line.

PREXCEL-Q circumvents the effect of qPCR-inhibitory material in all qPCR assays by exactly calculating the safe (non-inhibitory) dilutions for all samples and standards (without over-diluting any of them) thereby allowing the assay to achieve its hallmark desired LOG-linear amplifications that are truly reflective of the absolute and/or relative abundance of the nucleic acid targets of interest in the samples. It does so by first defining the legitimate boundaries of each qPCR assay by examining representative mixtures of all samples in each assay beforehand.

The information gathered from this preliminary test allows the extent of qPCR-inhibitory behavior introduced by the samples themselves to be measured and subsequently avoided by strategic dilutions of each sample preceding final qPCR evaluation.

The program has been used at Iowa State University for the past seven years in Dr. Mark Ackermann's laboratory, and is being beta-tested by several Iowa State researchers.

PREXCEL-Q allows scientists to unveil the absolute or relative presence of any stretch of genetic material of interest in any biological sample. The program swiftly and calculates all set-up parameters for all types of qPCR set-ups, and ensures that the gene expression analyses ultimately accomplished by the technique are precise.

PREXCEL-Q can solve problems universal to all qPCR reactions, and performs all necessary qPCR set-up calculations in less than 15 minutes for up to seven qPCR targets and 72 samples at a time-calculation.

Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 5,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

A 3D Paper-Based Microbial Fuel Cell
Researchers have developed a proof-of-concept 3D paper-based microbial fuel cell (MFC) that could take advantage of capillary action to guide the liquids through the MFC system and to eliminate the need for external power.
Wednesday, July 06, 2016
New Regulations for Producers Will Benefit Consumers
Food safety experts at Iowa State University are taking a lead role to help producers in Iowa and the Midwest comply with new federal regulations to guarantee the food we eat is safe.
Friday, October 23, 2015
Using Forensic Technology to Track Down Drug Residues in Milk
Veterinarians at Iowa State University are using advanced forensic techniques and the same technology used by crime scene investigators to monitor drug residues in milk and meat.
Tuesday, July 01, 2014
Studying the Structure of Drug Resistance in TB
Researchers at Iowa State and Ames Laboratory have used X-ray crystallography to study the structure of the tuberculosis efflux pump regulator.
Wednesday, August 29, 2012
OnLine Seed Technology and Business Graduate Program
The Graduate Program in Seed Technology and Business (STB) provides a unique opportunity for seed professionals to grow through the understanding of both science and technology that is key to seed industry, and broadly applicable business subjects.
Monday, November 09, 2009
Scientific News
Integrated Omics Analysis
Studying multi-omics promises to give a more holistic picture of the organism and its place in its ecosystem, however despite the complexities involved those within the field are optimistic.
Unravelling the Role of Key Genes and DNA Methylation in Blood Cell Malignancies
Researchers from the University of Nebraska Medical Center have demonstrated the role of Dnmt3a in safeguarding normal haematopoiesis.
Salford Lung Study - The First Real World Clinical Trial
In this podcast, we learn about the Salford Lung Study and its potential to revolutionize the way we assess new drugs and treatments around the world.
Point of Care Diagnostics - A Cautious Revolution
Advances in molecular biology, coupled with the miniaturization and improved sensitivity of assays and devices in general, have enabled a new wave of point-of-care (POC) or “bedside” diagnostics.
Preventing "Friendly Fire" in the Pancreas
Researchers inhibit process that leads to the body attacking its own insulin-producing cells.
3D-Printed Heart-On-A-Chip with Integrated Sensors
Researchers have created the first 3D-printed organ-on-a-chip with integrated sensors, paving the way for more complex, customizable devices.
Drug Target for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Found
A team of researchers led by UC San Francisco scientists has identified a new drug target for triple-negative breast cancer.
Fighting Cancer with Immune Response
New treatment elicits two-pronged immune response that destroys tumors in mice.
Nanomedicine for Breast Cancer Treatment
Using nanoparticles measuring only billionths of a meter in size, doctors are able to deliver drug molecules directly to the affected tissue.
MRSA Uses Decoys to Evade a Last-Resort Antibiotic
Researchers at Imperial College London have discovered that MRSA releases decoy molecules that allow them to escape being killed by the antibiotic.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,200+ scientific videos