Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Master Regulatory Gene of Epithelial Stem Cells Identified

Published: Friday, May 04, 2007
Last Updated: Tuesday, May 08, 2007
Bookmark and Share
Findings from a study at Harvard Medical School have implications for adult stem cell renewal & prostate, breast and skin cancer.

The skin’s ability to replace the tissue it sloughs off is controlled by a variety of genes. A new study from Harvard Medical School published in the May 4 issue of Cell, however, identifies a master regulator of this regeneration process not only for skin, but for many epithelial tissues including breast, prostate, and urogenital tract.

This master regulator of epithelial stem cells turns out to be the p63 gene, a close relative to the well-known tumor-suppressing p53 gene. Without p63, mutant mice run out of the regenerative epithelial stem cells.

The findings also have implications for cancers of the skin, breast and prostate, which are among the most common human malignancies.

The role of p63 in epithelial stem cells has been controversial. Some studies found that p63 maintains a steady pool of the regenerative cells, while other studies argued that p63 has more to do with causing the cells to differentiate into particular types of tissue.

The study, which was lead by Frank McKeon, PhD, professor of cell biology at Harvard Medical School (HMS), shows that p63’s role in not in tissue differentiation but rather to impart "stemness" to the regenerative cells in these tissues.

"With the p63-lacking mice you get normal commitment and differentiation," says McKeon. "The defect is simply running out of stem cells. When you run out of stem cells, you run out of those tissues as we have seen with the mice lacking the p63 gene."

Having established that p63 was only important to the maintenance of stem cells, McKeon and his research team then used the epithelial stem cell cloning methods developed by Howard Green, MD, the George Higginson professor of cell biology at HMS, to show that p63’s key function was to provide the enhanced potential of stem cells to divide.

"The fact that p63 is essential for these epithelial stem cells, while other master regulators have been identified for blood stem cells and spermatocyte stem cells, suggests a fundamental requirement for tissue specificity of these regulators that we don’t understand," says McKeon.

"Dissecting the genetic programs controlled by these regulators will tell us much about how stem cells function and how they go awry in cancer."


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 5,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Cancer's Taste for Fat
Researchers discovered signalling pathway for fat burning is disrupted in certain cancers.
Friday, September 16, 2016
Keeping Up with HIV Mutations
Team develops technology to increase the speed of HIV development in mice to model and quickly test vaccination strategies.
Friday, September 09, 2016
Enzyme that Triggers Cell Demise in ALS Identified
Scientists from Harvard have identified a key instigator of nerve cell damage in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
Thursday, August 25, 2016
Misdiagnosis in HCM Tests
Genetic tests for potentially fatal heart anomaly can misdiagnose condition in black Americans.
Thursday, August 18, 2016
Uncovering Constructor Proteins
Scientists have discovered a new bacterial cell wall builder that could be a target for antibiotic development.
Wednesday, August 17, 2016
Discovering the First Farmers
Genetic analyses reveal a collection of highly distinct groups in the Near East and Europe at the dawn of agriculture.
Thursday, July 28, 2016
Doubling Down on Dengue
HMS researchers have discovered two ways a compound blocks dengue virus.
Tuesday, April 26, 2016
Fighting Early Stage Alzheimer's
Mouse study suggests possibility of curbing early synapse loss in Alzheimer’s.
Monday, April 04, 2016
Breaking the Chain
Compound prevents multidrug-resistant fungi from pumping out drugs.
Tuesday, February 23, 2016
Breaking Point
Hotspots for DNA breaks cluster in specific genes in developing neurons.
Wednesday, February 17, 2016
The Spice of Life
Scientists discover important genetic source of human diversity.
Tuesday, February 09, 2016
Cytoskeleton Crew
Findings confirm sugar's role in helping cancers survive by changing cellular architecture.
Tuesday, February 09, 2016
The Power of Three
Overlooked portion of cell “death receptor” critical in some cancers, autoimmune diseases.
Tuesday, February 09, 2016
‘Lifespan Machine’ Probes Cause of Aging
Findings suggest that aging has no single mechanism.
Wednesday, February 03, 2016
Photo Finish
Nanoparticles pair photodynamic and molecular therapies against pancreatic cancer in mice.
Tuesday, January 26, 2016
Scientific News
Point of Care Diagnostics - A Cautious Revolution
Advances in molecular biology, coupled with the miniaturization and improved sensitivity of assays and devices in general, have enabled a new wave of point-of-care (POC) or “bedside” diagnostics.
Mass Spec Technology Drives Innovation Across the Biopharma Workflow
With greater resolving power, analytical speed, and accuracy, new mass spectrometry technology and techniques are infiltrating the biopharmaceuticals workflow.
One Step Closer to Precision Medicine for Chronic Lung Disease Sufferers
A study led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and National Jewish Health, has provided evidence of links between SNPs and known COPD blood protein biomarkers.
ReadCoor Launched to Commercialize 3D Sequencing Tech
ReadCoor will leverage the Wyss Institute’s method for simultaneously sequencing and mapping RNAs within cells and tissues to advance development of diagnostics.
Ancient Eggshell Protein Breaks Through DNA Time Barrier
Fossil proteins from a 3.8million year-old eggshell have been identifed, suggests proteins could give insight into evolutionary tree.
NCI Collaborates with Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
NCI collaborates with MMRF to incorporate genomic and clinical data into NCI Genomic Data Commons database.
New Imaging Technique in Alzheimer’s Disease
Study confirms new imaging technique corresponds a higher degree of actual brain changes.
Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Could Strengthen Airway Immunity
Mold toxins can weaken the airways' clearing mechanisms and immunity, but PKC inhibitors showed promise as a treatment.
Regulatory RNA Essential to DNA Damage Response
Researchers discover a tumour suppressor is stabilized by an RNA molecule, which helps cells respond to DNA damage.
Insight into Eye Diseases
Scientists recreate zebrafish cell regeneration from retinal stem cells in mice.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,000+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!