Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Circulating Tumor Cells can Reveal Genetic Signature of Dangerous Lung Cancers

Published: Friday, July 04, 2008
Last Updated: Friday, July 04, 2008
Bookmark and Share
MGH-developed device promises improvements in targeted therapy, treatment monitoring.

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have shown that an MGH-developed, microchip-based device that detects and analyzes tumor cells in the bloodstream can be used to determine the genetic signature of lung tumors, allowing identification of those appropriate for targeted treatment and monitoring genetic changes that occur during therapy.

A pilot study of the device called the CTC-chip will appear in the July 24 New England Journal of Medicine and is receiving early online release.

"The CTC-chip opens up a whole new field of studying tumors in real time,” says Daniel Haber, MD, director of the MGH Cancer Center and the study’s senior author.

“When the device is ready for larger clinical trials, it should give us new options for measuring treatment response, defining prognostic and predictive measures, and studying the biology of blood-borne metastasis, which is the primary method by which cancer spreads and becomes lethal.”

CTCs or circulating tumor cells are living solid-tumor cells found at extremely low levels in the bloodstream. Until the development of the CTC-chip by researchers from the MGH Cancer Center and BioMEMS (BioMicroElectroMechanical Systems) Resource Center, it was not possible to get information from CTCs that would be useful for clinical decision-making.

The current study was designed to find whether the device could go beyond detecting CTCs to helping analyze the genetic mutations that can make a tumor sensitive to treatment with targeted therapy drugs.

The CTC-chip was used to analyze blood samples from 27 patients – 23 who had EGFR mutations and 4 who did not – and CTCs were identified in samples from all patients. Genetic analysis of CTCs from mutation-positive tumors detected those mutations 92 percent of the time.

In addition to the primary mutation that leads to initial tumor development and TKI sensitivity, the CTC-chip also detected a secondary mutation associated with treatment resistance in some participants, including those whose tumors originally responded to treatment but later resumed growing.

“If tumor genotypes don’t remain static during therapy, it’s essential to know exactly what you’re treating at the time you are treating it,” says Haber.

“Biopsy samples taken at the time of diagnosis can never tell us about changes emerging during therapy or genotypic differences that may occur in different sites of the original tumor, but the CTC-chip offers the promise of noninvasive continuous monitoring.” Haber is the Kurt J. Isselbacher/Peter D. Schwartz Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,900+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 5,300+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Largest Resource of Protein-Protein Interactions
Researchers have developed the largest ever database of protein-protein interactions.
Wednesday, November 30, 2016
Blood Tests for Brain Cancer
Neurosurgeon works to develop the first blood-based test for patients with brain tumors.
Monday, November 21, 2016
Study Finds Following a Healthy Lifestyle Can Greatly Reduce Genetic Heart Attack Risk
Even among those at highest genetic risk, lifestyle factors can reduce incidence by one half.
Tuesday, November 15, 2016
Gut Microbiome Linked to Inflammatory Proteins
Study looking at influence of genetics, microbiome and environment on immune response links intestinal microbial population to production of inflammatory proteins.
Monday, November 07, 2016
HIV Patient's Lifespan Reduced More by Smoking than HIV
Study finds smoking has double the impact of HIV on life expectancy in those adhering to antiviral treatment.
Monday, November 07, 2016
Cancer Stem Cells Fuel Tumor Growth
Mass. General, Broad Institute team finds strong evidence that cancer stem cells are important drivers of tumors in patients.
Thursday, November 03, 2016
Tracking Alzheimer's Progression
MRI data reveals structural asymmetries that vary among individuals and are greater among those who develop dementia.
Wednesday, November 02, 2016
Signaling Pathway Could Be Key to Improved Osteoporosis Treatment
Inhibition of SIK2 enzyme both stimulates bone formation and reduces bone breakdown in animal model.
Thursday, October 20, 2016
Breast Cancer Cells Found To Switch Molecular Characteristics
Spontaneous interconversion between HER2-positive and HER2-negative states could contribute to progression, treatment resistance in breast cancer.
Friday, August 26, 2016
Obesity Prevents Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer
Researchers discover mechanism, linked to obesity, that increases inflammation and conditions in pancreatic cancer by creating an ideal micro-environment.
Tuesday, July 12, 2016
Nanoprobe Enables Measurement of Protein Dynamics in Living Cells
Mass. General and Harvard researchers use device to measure how anesthetic affects levels of Alzheimer's-associated proteins.
Thursday, June 16, 2016
Alzheimer’s Protein Serves as Natural Antibiotic
Alzheimer's-associated amyloid plaques may be part of natural process to trap microbes, findings suggest new therapeutic strategies.
Friday, May 27, 2016
Rapid Diagnosis of Bacterial Infections
Mass. General-developed compact system could shorten diagnostic time from days to hours, bring testing to point of care.
Wednesday, May 11, 2016
Functional Heart Muscle Regenerated in Decellularized Human Hearts
Mass. General team generates stem-cell derived heart muscle in cell-free human cardiac matrix.
Tuesday, March 15, 2016
First Gene that Causes Mitral Valve Prolapse Identified
An international research collaboration led by MGH investigators has identified the first gene in which mutations cause the common form of mitral valve prolapse, a heart valve disorder that affects almost 2.5 percent of the population.
Tuesday, August 11, 2015
Scientific News
Big Genetics in BC: The American Society for Human Genetics 2016 Meeting
Themes at this year's meeting ranged from the verification, validation, and sharing of data, to the translation of laboratory findings into actionable clinical results.
Stem Cells in Drug Discovery
Potential Source of Unlimited Human Test Cells, but Roadblocks Remain.
Cancer Genetics: Key to Diagnosis, Therapy
When applied judiciously, cancer genetics directs caregivers to the right drug at the right time, while sparing patients of unnecessary or harmful treatments.
BGI Sequences Gingko Tree, Revealing Large, Highly Repetitive Genome
Researchers at BGI have sequenced the more than 10-gigabase ginkgo genome to find a high number of repetitive sequences as well as a number of gene clusters that appear to be involved in defense mechanisms.
Survey of New York City Soil Uncovers Medicine-Making Microbes
Microbes have long been an invaluable source of new drugs. And to find more, we may have to look no further than the ground beneath our feet.
Accelerating the Detection of Foodborne Bacterial Outbreaks
The speed of diagnosis of foodborne bacterial outbreaks could be improved by a new technique developed by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Making Personalized Medicine a Reality
Groundbreaking technique developed at McMaster University is helping to pave the way for advances in personalized medicine.
Scientists Identify Unique Genomic Features in Testicular Cancer
The findings may shed light on factors in other cancers that influence their sensitivity to chemotherapy.
Top 10 Life Science Innovations of 2016
2016 has seen the release of some truly innovative products. To help you digest these developments, The Scientist have listed their top picks for the year.
BioCision Forms MedCision
The new company will focus on technologies for the management and automation of vital clinical processes.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,900+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,300+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!