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Microarray-based Assays for Blood Typing and Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases

Published: Friday, April 17, 2009
Last Updated: Friday, April 17, 2009
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University of Edinburgh scientists are developing multiplex microarray using Tecan’s LS Reloaded™ laser scanner.

Scientists at the University of Edinburgh are developing multiplex microarray assays to accelerate routine blood typing and diagnosis of infectious diseases, using Tecan’s LS Reloaded™ laser scanner for automated scanning of both microplates and slides.

Dr Colin Campbell, a research fellow at the university, explained: “We are developing microarray technology and assays specifically to improve the understanding and diagnosis of infectious diseases, especially those caused by herpes viruses or HIV. Our LS Reloaded scanner gives us the level of versatility that we need for assay development that other scanners could not provide. For example, the scanner allows a high degree of flexibility with a choice of materials and chip geometries so that we can scan from underneath or above, and can use silicon wafers and non-standard chip sizes.”

“We recently developed a microarray-based assay for ABO and Rhesus blood group typing, and are now developing this further to bring all the pre-transfusion testing for other blood groups and infectious diseases together on one microarray,” Dr Campbell continued. “Our ultimate aim is to develop a single microarray-based test that will include all the critical antigens that must be matched for a successful blood transfusion to take place.”


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