Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology Networks Header
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
 
Register | Sign in
Home Page>Posters

  Posters

The Effects of Dimethylphthalate on the Viability and Development of Drosophila melanogaster
Sara Mfarrej, Dr. Heather Cook, Dr. Donald Stearns, Dr. Zolton Fulop

My research studies the effect of dimethylphthalate (DMP), a putative endocrine disruptor, on the viability and development of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster.

More Information
Microwave Assisted Green Synthesis of Aspirin From Over The Counter Pain Creams
Annie E. Dineen, Jodie T. Wasacz

A successful microwave synthesis of methyl salicylate to aspirin using green catalysts from over the counter pain creams. The process was also prepared and tested in an undergraduate organic chemistry lab.

More Information
Analytical Pipetting of Serum
John Thomas Bradshaw, PhD, Leah Flumerfelt, Richard H. Curtis, PhD, Rachel Parshley

Many types of chemical and biological analyses are based upon analytical techniques involving accurate delivery of liquid components. Pipetting tools have become commonplace especially in many biological and pharmaceutical laboratories. While these tools are familiar to many, their operational differences when pipetting different types of solutions are often over-looked.

More Information
Targeted cancer therapy based on blocking the expression of genes and small doses of oxaliplatin.
Bavykin A.S.1, Korotaeva A.A.1, Poyarkov S.V.2, Syrtsev A.V.1, Karpukhin A.V.1

The major drawbacks of the prescribed chemotherapy, are still remain the significant side effects and drug - resistance. Even targeted chemotherapy by means of specific antibodies do not always help to solve these complications. Our purpose was to identify potential biological targets associated with the development of drug resistance and to develop a specific method of suppressing the viability of cancer cells exposed to low doses of standard chemotherapy.

More Information
Comparison of Three Methods for the Evaluation of Cytokine Storm Risk in Early and Clinical Stage Biopharmaceutical Development
Gary dos Santos and Emer Clarke

Objective: To identify an assay that can accurately predict the risk of CRS and CS associated with investigational biotherapeutics. A comparison of three methods were used: (a) immobilization of test antibody on plastic, (b) co-culture of PBMC's on HUVEC's and (c) pre-culture of PBMC's at high cell density.

More Information
Cloud Point Extraction of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Water Samples Identified by Raman Spectroscopy and Quantified by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Yanxiao Ma, Dr. Andrew F. Callender

Nanoparticles that are widely used in commercial products pose a threat to human health and the environment. This project proposes a cheaper and more effective method to identify and quantify metal oxide nanoparticles in water samples.

More Information
Cloud Point Extraction of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Water Samples Identified by Raman Spectroscopy and Quantified by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
Yanxiao Ma, Dr. Andrew F. Callender

Nanoparticles that are widely used in commercial products pose a threat to human health and the environment. This project proposes a cheaper and more effective method to identify and quantify metal oxide nanoparticles in water samples.

More Information
A multianalyte algorithm PCR-based blood test outperforms single analyte ELISA-based blood tests for neuroendocrine tumor detection
Mark Kidd, Irvin M Modlin, Daniele Alaimo, Stephen Callahan, Nancy Teixiera, Lisa Bodei, Ignat Drozdov

In a prospective study, in age-/sex- and ethnicity-matched patients and controls (n=82), a 51 panel multigene blood transcript test (NETest) was identified to be significantly more sensitive and accurate (>93%) than any single analyte assay (Chromogranin A, Pancreastatin or Neurokinin A) for neuroendocrine tumor detection.

More Information
New Sorbent from Agro-industrial Waste and its Potential Use in 17ß-Estradiol and 17α-Ethynylestradiol Removal
Suzimara Rovani*, Éder C. Lima, Renato Cataluña, Andreia N. Fernandes

In recent years, the increasing introduction of new chemicals in the market, and the development of more accurate analytical methods, added a variety of endocrine disruptors compounds (EDC). Even though they are found in very low concentrations (range of ng L-1) there is still a lack of knowledge about long-term risks of EDC for non-target organisms as well as for human health.

More Information
<< 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 >>
Showing Results 91 - 100 of 1052
Scientific News
Magnesium Cuts Diabetes Risk
Only about half of Americans get the recommended daily amount in their diet.
Major Step Forward in Understanding of Viruses
Scientists unlock exact structure of Hepatitis A virus.
TGAC Leads Research To Help Identify Animal-To-Human Transmitted Diseases
The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) will lead research into the development of bioinformatics to support the identification and characterisation of viruses through metagenomics.
Lab-developed Intestinal Organoids form Mature Human Tissue in Mice
Study produces unprecedented model to study intestinal diseases.
Study Investigates Inherent Contamination in Deep Well Microplates
Study gives data on microplates from numerous manufacturers based in Europe, USA and China.
Revalesio’s Drug Shows Promise in Treating Alzheimer’s
Multiple published research studies outline the potential for RNS60 to effectively treat Alzheimer’s disease by protecting neuronal function and restoring neuronal plasticity.
Shaking Up Cell Biology
Researchers focus in on decades old mystery.
Drinking Water Odors, Chemicals Above Health Standards Caused by 'Green Building' Plumbing
Several types of plastic pipes in eco-friendly green buildings in the United States have been found to leach chemicals into drinking water that can cause odors and sometimes exist at levels that may exceed health standards.
Fruit Fly Could Help Sniff Out Drugs and Bombs
Research from the University of Sussex has found a fly’s sense of smell could be used in new technology to detect drugs and bombs.
Nanoparticles Give up Forensic Secrets
Researchers from Switzerland have thrown light on the precise mechanisms responsible for the impressive ability of nanoparticles to detect fingermarks left at crime scenes.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner
Skyscraper Banner
Follow TechNetcom1 on Twitter
Technology Networks Ltd. on LinkedIn
Go to LabTube.tv