Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
qPCR
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

First Real Time Multiplex Quantification Test for Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

Published: Monday, June 25, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, June 25, 2012
Bookmark and Share
Genotyping assay to improve clinical outcomes by providing physicians with the information needed to develop personalized treatments for patients.

Seegene Inc. announced the development and commercialization of the first molecular assay for the detection, genotyping and quantification of nineteen high-risk and nine low-risk genotypes of the Human Papilloma virus (HPV). Seegene's breakthrough new test, QuantPlex™ HPV28 Genotyping Assay, will provide physicians with accurate HPV genotypes and quantification for nineteen high-risk and nine low-risk genotypes that are directly associated with cervical, genital area and oropharyngeal cancers. Release of the kit is anticipated for the third quarter of this year.

Persistent infections with specific strains of HPV can lead to the development of malignant lesions, and the direct link between HPV and cervical cancer has been well established. To date over 100 HPV types have been identified, of which approximately 40 are sexually transmissible. HPV types 16 and 18 have been associated with approximately 73% of invasive cervical cancers and approximately 10% of cases studied were co-infections of HPV types.

The plethora of HPV types and the correlation between infection and cancer make accurate HPV testing and typing a critical component of effective and efficient patient care. Multiple studies have shown that the molecular testing for the presence and type of HPV is critical when utilized with cytology, especially for neoplasia grade II or higher (CIN 2+).

Furthermore, quantification of viral burden at the time of testing, and over time, has proven to be critical in the determination of applying the correct treatment for the patient. Studies have consistently shown a link between viral burden and CIN grade along with a linkage between changes in viral burden and cytological abnormalities. In addition, evidence suggests that the determination of viral burden in a lesion can be a valuable prognostic indicator of abnormalities.

Nucleic acid-based methods, direct probe and signal amplification methods, such as PCR, are the most common and most sensitive detection approaches. PCR-based testing for HPV usually include a second post-detection and typing technique, such as solid phase hybridization. Limitations of these methods are either related to the inherent complexity of the systems or the relative long time to a result.
"As a highly multiplexed molecular assays capable of rapidly detecting and quantifying specific infections, our QuantPlex™ HPV28 Genotyping Assay will help improve clinical outcomes by providing physicians with the information they need to develop personalized treatments for their patients," said Dr. Jong-Yoon Chun, Founder, CTO and CEO of Seegene.

The QuantPlex™ HPV28 Genotyping Assay is based on TOCE™-CCMTA technology, a high multiplex real time quantitative PCR technology that allows the simultaneous detection, differentiation and quantification of up to 20 analytes on an existing 4-color real time instrument. This breakthrough technology can provide new and existing life science companies with a competitive edge in a wide range of molecular testing applications and industry sectors.


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,400+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
The Genetic Roots of Adolescent Scoliosis
Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences in collaboration with Keio University in Japan have discovered a gene that is linked to susceptibility of Scoliosis.
Diagnostic Test Developed for Enterovirus D68
researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a diagnostic test to quickly detect enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), a respiratory virus that caused unusually severe illness in children last year.
Simple Technology Makes CRISPR Gene Editing Cheaper
University of California, Berkeley, researchers have discovered a much cheaper and easier way to target a hot new gene editing tool, CRISPR-Cas9, to cut or label DNA.
RNAi Screening Trends
Understand current trends and learn which application areas are expected to gain in popularity over the next few years.
HPV Genomes Show Greater Diversity Than Expected in Cancer Patients
The findings could have implications for eventually understanding why some cervical lesions become malignant.
Rapidly Detecting Drug-Resistant HepC
A nested PCR-based assay has been shown to rapidly and accurately detect drug-resistant strains of the hepatitis C virus.
Researchers Seek Water Test for Invasive Species Detection
Detecting invasive lake and river species using just a water sample would be a dream come true for wildlife managers and regulators in the state and University of Maine researchers may soon make this an inexpensive reality.
New Cell Structure Finding Might Lead to Novel Cancer Therapies
University of Warwick scientists in the U.K. say they have discovered a cell structure which could help researchers understand why some cancers develop.
Ebola Assays Compared in Head-to-Head Analysis
A newly published study has attempted to rigorously evaluate a few of the assays recently granted Emergency Use Authorization by the US Food and Drug Administration to test for Ebola Zaire virus.
Profiling DNA Viruses in Arctic Lakes
The Arctic's freshwater lakes contain viral communities composed of DNA viruses from lineages that are largely distinct from those described elsewhere, a new study suggests.

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,400+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!