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VWR International, LLC to Distribute Illumina’s qPCR Portfolio

Published: Monday, November 12, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, November 12, 2012
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Dramatically expands sales reach within U.S. market.

Illumina, Inc. announced that VWR International, LLC, a global distributor of laboratory supplies and services, will distribute Illumina’s qPCR portfolio including the Eco™ Real-Time PCR System and NuPCR™ reagents within the United States, one of the world’s largest qPCR instrumentation markets. The agreement extends Illumina’s reach for its innovative Eco System and novel NuPCR probe-based technology into thousands of laboratories and facilities nationwide, by leveraging VWR’s 150 years of industry experience and its well-established distribution network.

“Complementing Illumina’s commercialization efforts with VWR’s talented team of sales and services representatives enables us to significantly expand promotion and support of both the Eco System and NuPCR reagents in molecular biology laboratories throughout the United States,” said Mark Lewis, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Illumina’s Molecular Biology and PCR Business. “We are very excited to join forces with VWR to accelerate adoption of our qPCR portfolio, particularly into the pharmaceutical and industrial markets where VWR has a strong presence.”

Real time PCR is a precise, highly sensitive PCR method with applications in basic research and diagnostics, where, for example, it is used for quantitation of gene expression targets, verification of array data, and pathogen detection. Illumina’s Eco Real-Time PCR System is an affordable, compact instrument that allows researchers to perform any qPCR application directly on their bench top and is an economical alternative to traditional large, expensive PCR instruments. The company’s novel, NuPCR probe-based qPCR technology is designed to show improved specificity and sensitivity to complex gene targets, as compared to existing qPCR technologies on the market today. It is compatible with any real-time PCR instrument platform, offering researchers a wider range of reagent choices to implement on their existing instrumentation.

“Illumina’s qPCR portfolio adds tremendous value to our existing PCR solutions portfolio,” said Bill Molnar, Vice President of Category Management, Life Sciences, VWR. “Both of our companies are committed to enabling the world’s scientists to accelerate research. The addition of the Eco System and NuPCR reagents provides an essential element to our product line, empowering us to effectively support key customer segments.”

Customer orders for Illumina’s qPCR portfolio through VWR will be accepted starting December 1, 2012.


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