Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Stem Cells, Cellular Therapy & Biobanking
>
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Sequentially Expressed Genes in Neural Progenitors Create Neural Diversity

Published: Monday, June 24, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, June 24, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Scientists found that a series of genes sequentially expressed in brain stem cells control the generation of neural diversity in visual system of fruit flies.

In order for the brain to properly develop and function, a vast array of different types of neurons and glia must be generated from a small number of progenitor cells. By better understanding the details of this process, scientists can develop ways to recognize and remedy a range of neural afflictions such as microcephaly or neurodegeneration.

The research, conducted in the laboratory of NYU Biology Professor Claude Desplan, examined this process by studying the neurons in the visual centers of the fruit fly Drosophila. Drosophila is a powerful model for studying neural diversity because of its relative simplicity, although the studied brain structure, termed the medulla, contains approximately 40,000 neurons, belonging to more than 70 cell types.

Specifically, they examined the genes expressed in neuroblasts—dividing neural stem cells that generate neurons—in the medulla and how and when they are expressed. Their findings revealed that five genes encoding five different transcription factors—proteins that bind to specific DNA sequences—are expressed in a specified order in each of the medulla neuroblasts as they age. The five genes form a temporal cascade: one gene can activate the next gene and repress the previous gene, thus ensuring the progression of the temporal sequence.

It is this process, the researchers found, that controls the sequential generation of different neural types in the Drosophila medulla. These results, together with other studies in the field, suggest that a similar mechanism is utilized to generate neural diversity in the brains of humans and other mammals.

The study’s lead authors were Xin Li and Ted Erclik, post-doctoral fellows in the Desplan lab.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,300+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 5,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Gene Therapy Via Ultrasound
Research into a gene therapy approach called sonoporation could help combat heart disease and cancer.
Stem Cell Therapy Heals Injured Mouse Brain
A team of researchers has developed a therapeutic technique that dramatically increases the production of nerve cells in mice with stroke-induced brain damage.
Challenging Stem Cell Fate Control
Researchers have found that the fate of stem cells is not only controlled by their local niche, but also by a cell-intrinsic mechanism.
Zika Proteins Responsible for Microcephaly Identified
Researchers have undertaken the first study to examine Zika infection in human neural stem cells from second-trimester fetuses.
Heart Muscle from Stem Cells Aid Cardiovascular Medicine
Researchers discover heart muscle cells from stem cells mirror expression patterns of key genes in donor tissue.
Examining New Hypotheses for Undiagnosed Patients
UnDx Consortium gathers in San Diego to create new paths to identifying currently undiagnosed illnesses.
Novel Therapeutic Approach for Blood Disorders
Gene editing of human blood-forming stem cells mimics a benign genetic condition that helps to overcome sickle cell disease and other blood disorders.
Bone Marrow Transplants Without Using Chemotherapy
Scientists have devised a way to destroy blood stem cells in mice without using chemotherapy or radiotherapy, both of which have toxic side effects.
How Cloud Connectivity Can Combat the Reproducibility Crisis
This infographic explains the reproducibility crisis, and how cloud connectivity can help overcome this problem.
Two Zika Proteins Responsible For Microcephaly Identified
It’s the first study to examine Zika infection in human neural stem cells from second-trimester fetuses, USC researchers say.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,300+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,000+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!