Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Join | Sign in
Home>Videos>This Video
  Videos

Return

Single Copy qPCR-Based Detection of BRAF and KRAS Mutations
Swift Biosciences Inc

Vladimir Makarov, Chief Scientific Officer, Swift Biosciences Inc

Abstract
The development of highly sensitive genotyping assays that are suitable for clinical diagnostics opens new opportunities for the detection, assessment, and management of cancer.  Anticipated uses for these assays include profiling tissue biopsies, circulating tumor cells (CTCs), and detecting mutations in circulating cell-free nucleic acids.  Swift Biosciences™ has developed myT™ Primers which have unique structural and thermodynamic properties that make them highly sensitive to mismatch discrimination. A myT Primer assay for BRAF V600E/K mutations demonstrated single mutant copy sensitivity in a background of 14,000 wild-type genomic DNA copies. This assay also demonstrated high specificity as indicated by a low percentage (< 3%) of amplification events from 14,000 wild-type genomic copies. myT Primer assays are compatible with multiple qPCR instruments and reaction mixes.  myT Primer qPCR assays for seven common KRAS mutations demonstrated similar sensitivity and specificity. When compared to a leading commercially available KRAS mutation qPCR test kit, several orders of improved specificity were observed. The extreme selectivity of myT Primer assays will be especially useful for detection of mutations present at ultra-low copy number and for genotyping difficult samples such as needle biopsies, CTCs, and serum, resulting in better detection, evaluation, and monitoring of cancer.

Request more information
Company product page


Access to this article and other content is for registered users.

Join the Technology Networks Community

  • Access to the latest scientific news, products and research through Technology Networks
  • Upload and share your posters on ePosters
  • View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
  • A library of 3,000+ scientific videos on LabTube


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you already have an account with Technology Networks, please use your existing login details. If you do not yet have an account please join here.

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
Characterizing the Micro-Mechanical Properties of Soft Materials, Tissues and Cells
Ernst Breel of Optics11 discusses the current problems with characterizing the mechanical properties of soft materials, focusing on how the company's Piuma Nanoindenter can assist researchers.
Results from the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University
The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center has published results of its work evaluating the potential for ANGLE’s Parsortix system.
Drugs that Activate Brain Stem Cells May Reverse Multiple Sclerosis
NIH-funded study identifies over-the-counter compounds that may replace damaged cells.
DNA Abnormalities Found in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease
Routine genetic screening of children with CKD could lead to earlier, more precise diagnoses.
Antibiotic Mechanism Discovered
A structural study revealed how an antibiotic called borrelidin stops bacterial growth.
Genetic Code Of Upland Cotton Cracked
Scientists decode the genetic makeup of upland cotton.
Genetic Variance Explains Poor Response to Common Asthma Medications
Study opens door to new therapies for hard-to-treat children.
Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Immune Therapy
Experimental immune therapy tested in preliminary study of women with triple-negative breast cancer.
Unprecedented Microbial Diversity in Isolated Amazonian Tribe
Scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine have discovered the most diverse collection of bacteria yet in humans among an isolated tribe of Yanomami Amerindians in the remote Amazonian jungles of Venezuela.
Broccoli Sprout Extract Promising for Head and Neck Cancer Prevention
Study shows broccoli sprout extract protects against oral cancer in mice.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters