Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology Networks Header
Saturday, November 01, 2014
 
Register | Sign in
Home Page > Videos > Mapping Chemical Gradients in Living Tissue in Space and Time Using Microfluidics
  Videos

Return

Mapping Chemical Gradients in Living Tissue in Space and Time Using Microfluidics
SelectBio

Chemical gradients drive many processes in biology, ranging from nerve signal transduction to ovulation. At present, microscopy is the primary tool used to understand these gradients. Microscopy has provided many important breakthroughs in our understanding of the fundamental biology, but is limited due to the need to incorporate fluorescent molecules into biological systems. As a result, there is a need to develop tools that can measure chemical gradient formation in biological systems that do not require fluorescent modification of the targets in question, can be multiplexed to measure more than one molecule and is compatible with a variety of biological sample types, including in vitro cell cultures and ex vivo tissue slices. Work from our group on the development of microfluidic tools to measure chemical gradients in living tissue will be presented. Two separate systems are under development. The first is a microfluidic system designed to analyze metabolite and protein expression from tissue. The sampling system can resolve up to 19 different ports and can be interface with either electrochemical or fluorescence-based detection methods. Using these two detection methods, we are capable of analyzing the release of either small molecule metabolites or proteins and peptides using immunoassays. The second system uses a high-density electrode array to image release of electrochemically active metabolites like nitric oxide from live tissue slices. Electrochemical characterization of this system combined with a microfluidic system for gradient generation will be shown.

Request more information
Company product page



For access to this article, enter your email address to instantly recieve a Password Reset link.

Please enter your email address below:

Existing users please Sign In here. Don't have an account? Register Here for free access.

Don't have an account? | Register Here

Scientific News
Eppendorf Award for Young European Investigators 2015: Call for Entries!
Eppendorf Award celebrates 20 years in 2015.
BPA Exposure by Infants May Increase Risk of Food Intolerance
Exposure to Bisphenol A at a dose significantly below the current FDA Tolerable Daily Intake predisposes offspring to food intolerance at adulthood.
Scientists Generate First Human Stomach Tissue in Lab with Stem Cells
Unprecedented tool for researching the development and diseases of an organ central to several public health crises.
Accelerating Spirocyclic Polyketide Synthesis
Powerful flow chemistry techniques used for complex multi-stage synthesis of spirocyclic polyketides.
MS Drug Candidate Shows Promise for Ulcerative Colitis
Positive new clinical data were released today on a drug candidate for ulcerative colitis that was first discovered and synthesized at The Scripps Research Institute.
First Atlas of Body Clock Gene Expression in Mammals Informs Timing of Drug Delivery
Penn Medicine study has implications for 100 top-selling US drugs, half of which target daily-oscillating genes.
New Technique has Profound Implications for Drug Development
The method, developed by Scripps Research Institute chemists, expands options for making pure batches of ‘one-handed’ molecules.
Blood Test Developed to Diagnose Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease
New blood-test could predict a person’s risk of developing AD much earlier than is currently possible.
Tea and Citrus Products Could Lower Ovarian Cancer Risk
New UEA research finds that women who consume foods containing flavonols and flavanones significantly decrease their risk of developing epithelial ovarian cancer.
TxCell Achieves Positive Results for Col-Treg in a Model of Autoimmune Uveitis
TxCell set for phase I/II proof of principle clinical study in Q2 2015 for its second therapeutic candidate in this rare eye disease.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner
Skyscraper Banner
Follow TechNetcom1 on Twitter
Technology Networks Ltd. on LinkedIn
Go to LabTube.tv