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Home Page > Videos > Results From Serum-Tumorautoantibody Profiling of Breast, Colon, Lung and Prostate Cancers Using a 16k Protein Array for Improving Minimal Invasive Diagnostics
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Results From Serum-Tumorautoantibody Profiling of Breast, Colon, Lung and Prostate Cancers Using a 16k Protein Array for Improving Minimal Invasive Diagnostics
Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH

Andreas Weinhäusel, Senior Scientist, Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH

Abstract
In Europe there were an estimated 3.2 million new cases of cancer in 2008. The most commonly reported cases in Europe were colorectal cancers ( 13.6%), breast cancer (13.1%), lung cancer (12.2%) and prostate cancer (11.9%). These 4 big cancer entities make up more than 50% of all cancers. It is well accepted that early detection of cancer does improve patient survival, thus there is a pressing need to improve early cancer detection.  This can be best fulfilled by an easy and simple test suitable for minimal invasive testing. Tumour-associated antigens (TAA) can be detected prior to clinical diagnosis and thus would be ideal biomarkers for early detection of cancer using only a few microliters of a patient's serum.We have developed an 16k protein-microarray using the UNIPEX human cDNA expression library. During methods optimization we studies the influence of different serum and plasma sampling procedures and finally came up with an optimized protocol using purified IgG from samples for TAA profiling. This protocol enabled definition of TAA classifier panels with very promising classification success of patients versus controls for the big 4 cancer entities. Currently we set up targeted microarrays for validation of our screening results. In addition in silico design of antigenic peptides from sero-reactive clone-sequences has also been conducted and preliminary data enabled an improved classification compared to corresponding proteins. Thus multiplexed protein and peptide based serum-analyses could further improve cancer diagnostics

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