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Protons, Heat and Mechanical Force Converge to Gate Two-Pore Potassium Channels at the Selectivity Filter
Dr Slav Bagriantsev, University of California, speaking at Ion Channel Targets 2011.
Date Posted: Friday, March 02, 2012

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