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Selection and Molecular Profiling of Circulating Tumor Cell (CTC) Sub-populations: Single-Cell Studies of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transitions
Professor Steven Soper, University of North Carolina, speaking at Single Cell Analysis Summit 2013.
Date Posted: Saturday, December 07, 2013

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