Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Technology
Networks
Scientific Communities
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>Resources>Webcasts>This Webcast
  Webcasts
BEAMing and Droplet Digital PCR Analysis of Mutant IDH1 mRNA in Tumor Extracellular Vesicles
Leonora Balaj, Massachusetts General Hospital, speaking at Exosomes and Circulating Biomarkers Summit 2013.
Date Posted: Saturday, March 01, 2014

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,100+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More Than 4,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Related Content

Alzheimer’s Protein Serves as Natural Antibiotic
Alzheimer's-associated amyloid plaques may be part of natural process to trap microbes, findings suggest new therapeutic strategies.
Friday, May 27, 2016
Rapid Diagnosis of Bacterial Infections
Mass. General-developed compact system could shorten diagnostic time from days to hours, bring testing to point of care.
Wednesday, May 11, 2016
Functional Heart Muscle Regenerated in Decellularized Human Hearts
Mass. General team generates stem-cell derived heart muscle in cell-free human cardiac matrix.
Tuesday, March 15, 2016
First Gene that Causes Mitral Valve Prolapse Identified
An international research collaboration led by MGH investigators has identified the first gene in which mutations cause the common form of mitral valve prolapse, a heart valve disorder that affects almost 2.5 percent of the population.
Tuesday, August 11, 2015
Intracellular Microlasers Could Allow Precise Labeling of up to a Trillion Individual Cells
MGH investigators have induced structures incorporated within individual cells to produce laser light at wavelengths that differ based on the size, shape and composition of each microlaser, allowing precise labeling of individual cells.
Tuesday, August 04, 2015
Evo-Engineered CRISPR-Cas9s Hit More Gene-Editing Targets
Scientists have engineered a more effective CRISPR- Cas9 system paving the way for more advanced applications.
Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Reducing Chemotherapy Drug’s Cardiac Side Effects
Preventing doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity could improve chemotherapy outcomes, reduce heart failure risk.
Thursday, December 11, 2014
Direct Drug Screening Of Biopsies Could Overcome Resistance
Combining genetic with pharmacologic screening of tumors may enable truly individualized treatment regimens.
Monday, November 17, 2014
Culture System Replicates Course Of Alzheimer’s Disease
Three-dimensional system should significantly reduce time and costs of drug development.
Monday, October 20, 2014
Genetic Signals Reflect the Evolutionary Impact of Cholera
Study identifies regions of genome associated with cholera susceptibility in Bangladesh.
Monday, July 08, 2013
Powerful Gene-Editing Tool Appears to Cause Off-Target Mutations in Human Cells
Results indicate need to improve precision of CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided nucleases.
Wednesday, June 26, 2013
Mass. General, Duke Study Identifies Two Genes that Combine to Cause Rare Syndrome
Mutations in genes that regulate cellular metabolism found in families with ataxia, dementia and reproductive failure.
Monday, May 13, 2013
Phase 1 ALS Trial is First to Test Antisense Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disease
No serious adverse effects seem from central-nervous-system infusion of drug that blocks mutated protein.
Tuesday, April 09, 2013
Protein Controlling Glucose Metabolism also a Tumor Suppressor
A protein known to regulate how cells process glucose also appears to be a tumor suppressor, adding to the potential that therapies directed at cellular metabolism may help suppress tumor growth.
Tuesday, December 11, 2012
Detection, Analysis of 'Cell Dust' may Allow Diagnosis, Monitoring of Brain Cancer
System combining nanotechnology and NMR detects particles shed by brain tumors in bloodstream.
Thursday, November 15, 2012
Scientific News
The Rise of 3D Cell Culture and in vitro Model Systems for Drug Discovery and Toxicology
An overview of the current technology and the challenges and benefits over 2D cell culture models plus some of the latest advances relating to human health research.
Grant Supports Project To Develop Simple Test To Screen For Cervical Cancer
UCLA Engineering announces funding from Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
Injecting New Life into Old Antibiotics
A new fully synthetic way to make a class of antibiotics called macrolides from simple building blocks is set to open up a new front in the fight against antimicrobial drug resistance.
Insight into Bacterial Resilience and Antibiotic Targets
Variant of CRISPR technology paired with computerized imaging reveals essential gene networks in bacteria.
Advancing Protein Visualization
Cryo-EM methods can determine structures of small proteins bound to potential drug candidates.
Alzheimer’s Protein Serves as Natural Antibiotic
Alzheimer's-associated amyloid plaques may be part of natural process to trap microbes, findings suggest new therapeutic strategies.
Slime Mold Reveals Clues to Immune Cells’ Directional Abilities
Study from UC San Diego identifies a protein involved in the directional ability of a slime mold.
How Do You Kill A Malaria Parasite?
Drexel University scientists have discovered an unusual mechanism for how two new antimalarial drugs operate: They give the parasite’s skin a boost in cholesterol, making it unable to traverse the narrow labyrinths of the human bloodstream. The drugs also seem to trick the parasite into reproducing prematurely.
Illuminating Hidden Gene Regulators
New super-resolution technique visualizes important role of short-lived enzyme clusters.
Supressing Intenstinal Analphylaxis in Peanut Allergy
Study from National Jewish Health shows that blockade of histamine receptors suppresses intestinal anaphylaxis in peanut allergy.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,100+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,500+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!