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New And Beneficial Function Of Endogenous Retroviruses In Immune Response Identified
ERV play a critical role in the body’s immune defense against common bacterial and viral pathogens.
Scientists Identify New and Beneficial Function of Endogenous Retroviruses
Researchers found that ERV play a critical role in the body’s immune defense against common bacterial and viral pathogens.
Cells Build 'Cupboards' To Store Metals
Lawrence Livermore researchers have discovered that cells of the alga Chlamydomonas Reinhardti build a “pantry” to store metal and maintain equilibrium.
Predicting Antibiotic Resistance
A common set of features appear to be responsible for the development of resistance to several types of antibiotics.
53 Approved Drugs that May Block Ebola Infection Identified
Compounds may keep virus from entering cells and could accelerate drug development.
Tailor-Made Cancer Treatments? New Cell Culture Technique Paves The Way
Technique grew cells from 73% of patients in the study, more than three times as effective as previous methods.
Non-Gluten Proteins as Targets of Immune Response to Wheat in Celiac Disease
The results were reported online in the Journal of Proteome Research.
New Research Unlocks a Mystery of Albinism
A team led by Brown University biologists has discovered the way in which a specific genetic mutation appears to lead to the lack of melanin production underlying a form of albinism.
Predicting Sepsis
Altered white-blood-cell motion in burn patients may warn of infection.
Study Finds Genetic Clue To Menopause-Like Condition In Young Women
NIH-funded research may also contribute to understanding normal menopause.
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NMR as a Tool for Examining Mechanisms of Transport and Inhibition in CLC “Chloride Channels”
Shelley Elvington, Stanford University, speaking at Ion Channel Targets 2011.
Date Posted: Friday, March 02, 2012
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Stem Cells Faulty In Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
In a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, muscle stem cells express connective-tissue genes associated with fibrosis and muscle weakness, according to a new study.
Thursday, December 18, 2014
Big Data Helps Pinpoint Possible New Stent Drug
Replacing the current drug used to coat artery-opening stents with a drug more targeted to the actual cause of stent disease could reduce blood clots and heart attacks.
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
Stanford Engineers Discover How to Record the Forensic History of Chemical Contaminations in Water
An invention called a time capsule is a tiny chemistry lab designed to take a fingerprint of contamination and also disclose when it occurred.
Tuesday, November 18, 2014
Tumor Suppressor Also Inhibits Key Property Of Stem Cells
The retinoblastoma protein inhibits cancer by controlling cell division. Now, researchers have shown that it also binds to and inhibits genes necessary for pluripotency.
Friday, November 14, 2014
'Evolved' Protein May Stop Cancer From Spreading
Experimental therapy stopped the metastasis of breast and ovarian cancers in lab mice, pointing toward a safe and effective alternative to chemotherapy.
Wednesday, October 01, 2014
Stanford Engineers Aim to Connect the World with Ant-sized Radios
Costing just pennies to make, tiny radios-on-a-chip are designed to serve as controllers or sensors for the 'Internet of Things.'
Tuesday, September 16, 2014
Assessing the Costs and Benefits of Fracking
New analysis finds hydraulic fracturing poses dangers for people living near the wells, now a Stanford-led study believes we can do better.
Monday, September 15, 2014
Key Mechanism in Energy and Information Storage
Observing how hydrogen is absorbed into individual palladium nanocubes, Stanford materials scientists have detailed a key step in storing energy and information in nanomaterials.
Monday, September 15, 2014
Stanford Research Shows Value of Clams, Mussels in Cleaning Dirty Water
New Stanford research shows that bivalves can cleanse streams, rivers and lakes of potentially harmful chemicals that treatment plants can't fully remove.
Tuesday, August 19, 2014
Beaming Power To Medical Chips Deep Inside The Body
A Stanford electrical engineer has invented a way to wirelessly transfer power deep inside the body.
Tuesday, May 20, 2014
Research Shows Importance of European Farmers Adapting to Climate Change
New Stanford research reveals that farmers in Europe will see crop yields affected as global temperatures rise, but that adaptation can help slow the decline for some crops.
Tuesday, May 20, 2014
Stanford Research Leads to New Understanding of How Cells Grow and Shrink
Researchers use new techniques to document how cells can conceal growth and then suddenly swell up.
Saturday, May 17, 2014
Stanford Bioengineers Create Circuit Board Modeled on the Human Brain
Development offers greater possibilities for advances in robotics and a new way of understanding the brain.
Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Stanford Scientists Discover a Novel Way to Make Ethanol Without Corn or Other Plants
Stanford scientists have created a copper-based catalyst that produces large quantities of ethanol from carbon monoxide gas at room temperature.
Saturday, April 12, 2014
New Stanford Facility will Test Water-Recovery Technology
The new Codiga Resource Recovery Center at Stanford will accelerate commercial development of promising technologies for recovery of clear water and energy from wastewater.
Wednesday, March 26, 2014
 
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