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Code of the Wild: A Documentary Film Exploring the Genome Editing Revolution

Article

In the Code of the Wild documentary film, Cody Sheehy (award winning producer and director) and CRISPR scientist Samira Kiani explore the controversial and secretive world of genetic engineering. In an interview with Kiani and Sheehy, we cover all aspects of Code of the Wild, including the making of the documentary film, the discovery of Jiankui He's experiment that shook the world and the concept of being able to "purchase" a longer life span.

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10 Things We Didn't Know Last Week – 10 May 2019

List

A wrap-up of the biggest science news from the last 7 days.

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A Brief History of DNA

Infographic

National DNA Day honors the completion of the Human Genome Project in April 2003 and the discovery of the double helix of DNA in 1953. In this infographic we rewind time to explore the history of DNA and some of the landmark discoveries in the field of genomics.

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Antimicrobial Resistance: Drivers, Diagnostics and DNA

List

Combating AMR is going to take coordinated action of different approaches, such as improved public education and national action plans, greater surveillance, improved diagnostics, and the ability to harness advances in genomics and big data.

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Detecting Genetically Engineered Organisms in the Wild

News

If a genetically or synthetically engineered organism is released into the environment, how will we know? How can we tell it apart from the millions of microorganisms that exist naturally in the wild? Researchers are now developing a biosecurity tool that can detect engineered microorganisms based on their unique DNA signatures.

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What Next After GWAS?
News

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) look at large populations to find genes that contribute to common, multi-gene traits like height or obesity. These comprehensive studies frequently turn up large numbers of tiny genetic variations that occur more often in people who are tall, obese, etc. So which genes should scientists investigate further?

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Why Not Catching Enough Zzz’s Is Bad for Your Heart
News

In recent years, numerous studies have shown that people who don't get enough sleep are at greater risk of stroke and heart attack. A study found that people who sleep fewer than 7 hours per night have lower blood levels of three physiological regulators, or microRNAs, which influence gene expression and play a key role in maintaining vascular health.

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Putting Concussion Under the Genetic Microscope
News

The world’s first study on whether genetic variations are involved in the post-traumatic headache experienced by some people following concussion is underway at QUT, funded by a $250,000 US Department of Defence grant.

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Cell Migration: Clinical Relevance, Unique Movement Patterns and Driving Technologies
Article

Cells like to move it, move it! Understanding the mechanisms behind cell migration represents an important piece to the puzzle of many fundamental biological processes and pathologies. This article delves into textbook models of cell migration, recent insights on movement patterns, and highlights the technology driving cell migration research forward.

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The First Winners of the LEA
Article

The Lipidomics Excellence Award (LEA) was founded to strengthen life sciences through lipidomics. After reviewing the many high-quality submitted projects, the LEA jury has announced the three awardees.

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The Evolution of Proteomics - Dr Evangelia Petsalaki
Article

Dr Evangelia Petsalaki is a Group Leader at the European Bioinformatics Group, where her research team study human cell signaling in health and disease conditions. Collaborating with teams specializing in MS, imaging and cell biology, their aim is to make both predictive and conditional models so they can anticipate what might happen in a biological network under different conditions.

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Whole-Exome Sequencing at the Dawn of Personalized Medicine
Article

Deciphering the first complete sequence of the human genome in 2003 required a combined effort of scientists from 20 institutions and $3 billion of funding. Over the last decade, whole-exome sequencing (WES) established itself as a method that successfully balances cost and the output of useful data for diagnostic or research applications. Here, we look at how WES is used in both the laboratory and the clinic, and why it is a preferred method of choice in such areas.

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The Evolution of Proteomics – Professor Ruedi Aebersold
Article

Kicking off "The Evolution of Proteomics" series is a pioneer of proteomics, Professor Ruedi Aebersold. Aebersold's research in quantitative proteomics has helped shape our understanding of how proteins function, interact and are localized in both normal and diseased states.

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The Word on Everyone’s Lips: Sustainability
Article

Sustainability is a hot topic as the world’s population continues to rise, bringing with it a demand for increased food production. This article takes a look at the Agricultural Engineering Precision Innovation (Agri-EPI) Centre that was set up by the UK government as part of the Industrial Challenge Strategy, to innovate technology in agriculture.

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