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Nice to hear it’s not just me……
Industry Insight

Nice to hear it’s not just me……

Nice to hear it’s not just me……
Industry Insight

Nice to hear it’s not just me……


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Although it has been a few years since I actually stepped foot in a lab to perform an actual, real-life experiment I still consider myself a scientist (and always will).


It is therefore incredibly frustrating when I see how some scientific news stories are reported in the media. It seems that barely a day goes by without certain British newspapers running a story about what everyday food/activity/electronic item* (*delete as appropriate) causes cancer. Having said that, I often wonder if my frustration is yet another sign that I am becoming a grumpy old man.


This excellent blog post from Martin Robbins at The Guardian makes me feel a whole lot better about myself and really highlights why scientific reporting in the media should be taken with a healthy dose of salt.

I would really like to hear your thoughts and experiences with how science is reported in the media.

Connect with Ashley on Google+

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