Coming to a Lab Bench Near You: Femtosecond X-Ray Spectroscopy

News   Apr 13, 2017 | Original story from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

 
Coming to a Lab Bench Near You: Femtosecond X-Ray Spectroscopy

Upon light activation (in purple, bottom row’s ball-and-stick diagram), the cyclic structure of the 1,3-cyclohexadiene molecule rapidly unravels into a near-linear shape in just 200 femtoseconds. Using ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy, researchers have captured in real time the accompanying transformation of the molecule’s outer electron “clouds” (in yellow and teal, top row’s sphere diagram) as the structure unfurls. (Credit: Kristina Chang/Berkeley Lab)

 
 
 

RELATED ARTICLES

Physicists Develop Faster Way to Make Bose-Einstein Condensates

News

Physicists have invented a new technique to cool atoms into condensates, which is faster than the conventional method and conserves a large fraction of the original atoms. The team used a new process of laser cooling to cool a cloud of rubidium atoms all the way from room temperature to 1 microkelvin, or less than one-millionth of a degree above absolute zero.

READ MORE

Water Cooling for the Earth's Crust

News

By applying a new analysis method, researchers have now discovered that sea water can penetrate to depths of more than 10 kilometres below the seafloor. This result suggests a stronger cooling effect on the hot mantle.

READ MORE

Physicists Design $100 Handheld Muon Detector

News

Physicists have designed a pocket-sized cosmic ray muon detector to track these ghostly particles. The detector can be made with common electrical parts, and when turned on, it lights up and counts each time a muon passes through. The relatively simple device costs just $100 to build, making it the most affordable muon detector available today.

READ MORE

 

Comments | 0 ADD COMMENT

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE