We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

Advertisement

Coming to a Lab Bench Near You: Femtosecond X-Ray Spectroscopy

News   Apr 13, 2017 | Original story from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

 
Coming to a Lab Bench Near You: Femtosecond X-Ray Spectroscopy

Upon light activation (in purple, bottom row’s ball-and-stick diagram), the cyclic structure of the 1,3-cyclohexadiene molecule rapidly unravels into a near-linear shape in just 200 femtoseconds. Using ultrafast X-ray spectroscopy, researchers have captured in real time the accompanying transformation of the molecule’s outer electron “clouds” (in yellow and teal, top row’s sphere diagram) as the structure unfurls. (Credit: Kristina Chang/Berkeley Lab)

 
 
Advertisement
 

RELATED ARTICLES

Tackling Nitrate Pollution A "Greener" Way

News

Scientists have found a catalyst that efficiently transforms nitrate into nitrite—an environmentally important reaction—without requiring high temperature or acidity, and now have identified the mechanism that makes this efficiency possible.

READ MORE

Molding Matter at the Molecular Level

News

Scientists used a focused beam of electrons to stitch platinum-silicon molecules into graphene, marking the first deliberate insertion of artificial molecules into a graphene host matrix.

READ MORE

Mystery of First Color Photos Solved

News

A palette of colors on a silver plate: that is what the world's first color photograph looks like. Taken by Edmond Becquerel in 1848, his process was empirical, but never explained, and quickly abandoned. Now researchers have now shone a light on this.

READ MORE

 

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE