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It's all in the crystals…
News

It's all in the crystals…

It's all in the crystals…
News

It's all in the crystals…

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Abstract

Macromolecular crystallography relies on the availability and quality of single crystals; these are typically obtained through extensive screening, which has a very low intrinsic success rate. Crystallization is not a completely stochastic process and many proteins do not succumb to crystallization because of specific microscopic features of their molecular surfaces. It follows that rational surface engineering through site-directed mutagenesis should allow a systematic and significant improvement in crystallization success rates.

The article is published online in Acta Crystallographica Section D, Biological Crystallography and is free to access.

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