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Lab-on-a-Chip Device from Berkeley Lab to Speed Proteomics Research
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Lab-on-a-Chip Device from Berkeley Lab to Speed Proteomics Research

Lab-on-a-Chip Device from Berkeley Lab to Speed Proteomics Research
News

Lab-on-a-Chip Device from Berkeley Lab to Speed Proteomics Research

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The U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has developed a device called multinozzle nanoelectrospray emitter array that provides the first monolithic interface between mass spectrometry and silicon/silica-based microfluidic “lab-on-a-chip” technologies to accelerate future proteomics research.

“Proteomics has become an indispensable tool in biological research, be it diagnostics, therapeutics, bioenergy or stem cell research, and mass spectrometry is proteomics’ enabling technology,” said Daojing Wang, a scientist with Berkeley Lab’s Life Sciences Division who leads the proteomics research group and was the principal investigator behind the development of the multinozzle nanoelectrospray emitter.

“Lab-on-a-chip technology has enormous potential for proteomics research,” Wang said, “but for this potential to be fully realized, a major advance in interfacing microfluidics with mass spectrometry is needed. Our device provides that interface.”

Wang and Peidong Yang, a nanoscience authority with Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry and Materials Sciences Division, and also a chemistry professor with the University of California’s Berkeley campus, co-authored a paper on this work which is being published by the American Chemical Society (ACS).

The paper, which is now available in the on-line version. is entitled: “Microfabricated Monolithic Multinozzle Emitters for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry.”

Other authors of the ACS paper were Woong Kim, a postdoctoral fellow in the Molecular Foundry, and Mingquan Guo, a postdoctoral fellow in the Life Sciences Division.

When the Human Genome Project was completed in 2003, giving scientists a complete catalogue of human DNA, the next big effort focused on genomics, identifying DNA sequences that code for proteins, aka, genes. With the identification of each and every new gene, the emphasis shifts to determining the biochemical function of its associated proteins.

Each emitter consists of a parallel array of silica nozzles protruding out from a hollow silicon sliver with a conduit size of 100 x 10 microns. Multiple nozzles (100 nozzles per millimeter was a typical density) were used rather than single nozzles in order to reduce the pressure and clogging problems that arise as the microfluidic channels on a chip downsize to a nanometer scale.

The emitters and their nozzles were produced from a silicon wafer, with the dimension and number of nozzles systematically and precisely controlled during the fabrication process. Fabrication required the use of only a single mask and involved photolithographic patterning and various etching processes.

Said Peidong Yang, “Once integrated with a mass spectrometer, our microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters achieved a sensitivity and stability in peptide and protein detection comparable to commercial silica-based capillary nanoelectrospray tips. This indicates that our emitters could serve as a critical component in a fully integrated silicon/silica-based micro total analysis system for proteomics.”

Added Daojing Wang, “This is also the first report of a multinozzle emitter that can be fabricated through standard microfabrication processes. In addition to having lower back pressure and higher sensitivity, multinozzle emitters also provide a means to systematically study the electrospray ionization processes because the size of each nozzle and density of nozzles on the emitters can be adjusted.”

According to Wang and Yang, the fabrication and application of the microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters, called “M3 emitters” for short, could be commercialized immediately and should be highly competitive with current silica capillary emitters in terms of cost and mass production.

“We are now in the process of creating a chip that integrates sample processing and preparation as well as detection and analysis,” said Wang. “The ability to perform the full process on a single chip has enormous commercial potential.”

Berkeley lab has filed for a patent on this technology. The research was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, with some of the work done at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry, which is supported by the Office of Science in the U.S. Department of Energy.

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