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Light-powered Catalyst Can Break Strong Fluorocarbon Bonds of Persistent Pollutants

News   Jun 23, 2020 | Original story from Rice University

 
Light-powered Catalyst Can Break Strong Fluorocarbon Bonds of Persistent Pollutants

An artist's illustration of the light-activated antenna-reactor catalyst Rice University engineers designed to break carbon-fluorine bonds in fluorocarbons. The aluminum portion of the particle (white and pink) captures energy from light (green), activating islands of palladium catalysts (red). In the inset, fluoromethane molecules (top) comprised of one carbon atom (black), three hydrogen atoms (grey) and one fluorine atom (light blue) react with deuterium (yellow) molecules near the palladium surface (black), cleaving the carbon-fluorine bond to produce deuterium fluoride (right) and monodeuterated methane (bottom). Credit: H. Robatjazi/Rice University

 
 
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