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Metrohm USA Extends Young Chemist Award to Honor Top 5 Submissions
News

Metrohm USA Extends Young Chemist Award to Honor Top 5 Submissions

Metrohm USA Extends Young Chemist Award to Honor Top 5 Submissions
News

Metrohm USA Extends Young Chemist Award to Honor Top 5 Submissions

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Metrohm USA is proud to recognize the Top 5 applicants of its 2016 Young Chemist award. In addition to this year’s $10,000 award winner Amay Bandodkar from the University of California San Diego, the expert panel also awarded four honorable mention awards. 

Honorable mentions

Erica Brunelle (University at Albany, State University of New York) is helping to develop a bioassay systems to identify of physical attributes of the fingerprint originator including gender.

Hae Lin Jang (Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School) works with a novel synthetic condition of the secondary bone mineral whitlockite that helps reveal complex precipitation kinetic mechanisms of biomolecules in vivo and recreates them ex vivo via titration.

The goal of Seyedeh Moloud Mousavi’s (University of Minnesota) research is to develop a powerful analytical technique that allows selective and in-situ detection of ionic pollutants in low concentrations and in a time-resolved manner.

Shannon Owings’ (Georgia Institute of Technology) study focuses on developing new methodologies to monitor the speciation of arsenic and manganese during incubations with bacteria and sediments.  

See below for more details,

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