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NMR Shows New Molecular Phenomenon
News

NMR Shows New Molecular Phenomenon

NMR Shows New Molecular Phenomenon
News

NMR Shows New Molecular Phenomenon

Credit: The University of Warwick
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Cutting edge technology has shown a molecule self-assembling into different forms when passing between solution state to solid state, and back again says research by the University of Warwick. Professor Steven P. Brown from the Department of Physics, with colleagues in the Department of Chemistry, have identified that the supramolecular structure of a guanosine derivative can be different upon passing from the solid state into the solution state and vice versa.

This defies chemical precedent, as self-assembled structures driven by the formation of specific intermolecular hydrogen bonds in solution would be expected to remain the same in the solid state. The phenomenon was revealed by the state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) facility at Warwick.

In solution state, the guanosine derivative analysed by the researchers is constituted by quartet-like molecular structure, and scientific intuition would suggests that this should remain like this in the solid state. However, upon changing into the solid state, the supramolecular assembly surprisingly contains both quartet and ribbon structures.

Professor Brown and his colleagues made this discovery using advanced NMR spectroscopy technology, which measures the magnetic response of nuclei at the centre of atoms. The researchers identified the distinct supramolecular states by spotting varying peaks in spectra that identify close approach of these magnetic nuclei in atoms.

Professor Brown comments: “Access to state-of-the-art NMR infrastructure has enabled us to see with chemical precision how the guanosine-based molecules self-assemble, thus revealing the surprising phenomenon of a change in self-assembly upon going changing from solution to solid and from solid to solution.”

The University of Warwick’s national solid-state NMR facility is directed by Professor Brown and a Facility Executive with scientists from 4 other UK universities - and was officially launched in 2010. The facility and this research is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

Reference:
Reddy, G. N. M., Huqi, A., Iuga, D., Sakurai, S., Marsh, A., Davis, J. T., … Brown, S. P. (2016). Co-existence of distinct Supramolecular assemblies in solution and in the solid state. Chemistry - A European Journal, 23(10), 2315–2322. doi:10.1002/chem.201604832

This article has been republished from materials provided by the University of Warwick. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

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