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Novel Drugs Could Improve Long-term Treatment of Poorly Controlled Asthma

News   Oct 14, 2019 | Original story from the University of South Florida Health (USF Health)

 
Novel Drugs Could Improve Long-term Treatment of Poorly Controlled Asthma

High-resolution fluorescent confocal images showing human airway smooth cells exposed to three different drugs over 15 hours: The drug diphenhydramine (DPD), bottom row, retains more TAS2R14 bitter taste receptors (red) on the cell surface, undergoing less degradation than the receptors interacting with the drugs chlorhexidine (CLX) and flufenamic (FFA). The more pronounced yellow in middle and upper right frames represents co-localization of the receptor (red) and an endosome marker (green), meaning that the receptors binding to CLX and FFA have already been taken inside the cells and are on a path to being degraded. Credit: Images generated by instrumentation in the Microscopy Core at the University of South Florida Byrd Alzheimer's Center

 
 
 

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