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Taking a Close Look at What Microbes Munch

News   Jun 01, 2018 | Original Story from North Carolina State University.

 
Taking a Close Look at What Microbes Munch

The gutless marine worm Olavius algarvensis was used as a test case for the new technique. This worm does not have a digestive system and instead is fed by a community of symbiotic bacteria living in the worm. Credit: Christian Lott.

 
 
 

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