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Two Decades of Studying Non-Covalent Biomolecular Assemblies by Means of Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry
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Two Decades of Studying Non-Covalent Biomolecular Assemblies by Means of Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

Two Decades of Studying Non-Covalent Biomolecular Assemblies by Means of Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry
News

Two Decades of Studying Non-Covalent Biomolecular Assemblies by Means of Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

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Abstract
Mass spectrometry (MS) is a recognized approach for characterizing proteins and the complexes they assemble into. This application of a long-established physico-chemical tool to the frontiers of structural biology has stemmed from experiments performed in the early 1990s. While initial studies focused on the elucidation of stoichiometry by means of simple mass determination, developments in MS technology and methodology now allow researchers to address questions of shape, inter-subunit connectivity and protein dynamics. Here, we chart the remarkable rise of MS and its application to biomolecular complexes over the last two decades.

The article is published online in The Journal of the Royal Society Interface and is free to access.

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