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Unexpected Enzyme Structure Holds Handy Properties

News   Oct 04, 2018 | Original Story by Anne Trafton for Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 
Unexpected Enzyme Structure Holds Handy Properties

MIT researchers have shown that some of the atoms in an enzyme called carbon monoxide dehydrogenase can rearrange themselves when oxygen levels are low. A nickel atom (green) leaves the cube-like structure, displacing an iron atom (orange). One sulfur atom (yellow) also moves out of the cube. Credit: Elizabeth Wittenborn.

 
 
 

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