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Bruker Daltonics Introduces flexImaging™ 2.0 Software
Product News

Bruker Daltonics Introduces flexImaging™ 2.0 Software

Bruker Daltonics Introduces flexImaging™ 2.0 Software
Product News

Bruker Daltonics Introduces flexImaging™ 2.0 Software


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At the 18th ASMS Sanibel Conference on Imaging Mass Spectrometry, Bruker Daltonics has announced the release of its flexImaging 2.0 software solution for acquisition and evaluation of MALDI-TOF and TOF/TOF imaging data.

MALDI imaging of tissue samples with Bruker’s flexImaging 2.0 can allow color-coded visualization of the distribution of biomarkers or absorbed drugs and their major metabolites.

The Company’s MALDI imaging solutions can provide a tool for the direct analysis of biomarker candidates or drug/metabolite distributions in tissue sections.

Integrating multivariate statistical classifications such as PCA or variance ranking, flexImaging 2.0 now can provide Class Imaging as an extension to the established Mass Imaging.

Dr. Michael Schubert, Executive Vice President of Bruker Daltonics, commented: “Statistical biomarker or drug/metabolite data obtained with the FLEX™ series MALDI-TOF and TOF/TOF mass spectrometers can now be merged easily with molecular images for in-depth investigation of the spatial distribution of relevant marker candidates in tissues.”

He said, “We expect this breakthrough technology to further the diagnostics and pathology research, as well as the drug development applications of MALDI imaging.”

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