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HPLC Controls Beer Fermentation and Stability & Assesses Authenticity
Product News

HPLC Controls Beer Fermentation and Stability & Assesses Authenticity

HPLC Controls Beer Fermentation and Stability & Assesses Authenticity
Product News

HPLC Controls Beer Fermentation and Stability & Assesses Authenticity


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Thermo Fisher Scientific has developed a new gradient high-performance liquid chromatography methods that use a spectro-electro array platform to measure specific analytes in beer samples, distinguish between different samples, and study beer stability.

Application Note 1065: Gradient HPLC Method for Analysis of Beer Polyphenols, Proanthocyanidins, and Bitter Acids Using a Novel Spectro-Electro Array Platform demonstrates a method that provides accurate and sensitive measurements that cannot be obtained using ultraviolet detection alone, as well as metabolomic approaches that can be used to study fermentation, product stability, and authenticity issues.

Beer is the most widely consumed alcoholic beverage in the world and the third most popular drink after water and tea. Beer is typically brewed from four basic ingredients: water, a starch source such as malted barley, brewer’s yeast, and a flavoring agent such as hops.

Many varieties of beer result from differences in these ingredients, the additives used, and the brewing process. Therefore, beer bottling companies need efficient methods to measure and control the phenolic compounds extracted from the starch source and bitter acids from hops.

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