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Simple, Fast Determination of Phytic Acid in Soybeans and Black Sesame Seeds
Product News

Simple, Fast Determination of Phytic Acid in Soybeans and Black Sesame Seeds

Simple, Fast Determination of Phytic Acid in Soybeans and Black Sesame Seeds
Product News

Simple, Fast Determination of Phytic Acid in Soybeans and Black Sesame Seeds


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Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. has announced a simple, fast (< 10 min per injection) isocratic method for the determination of phytic acid (as phytate) in soybeans and black sesame seeds by using a hydroxide-selective column combined with a Reagent-Free™ ion chromatography (RFIC™) system, as described in Application Note 295, Determination of Phytic Acid in Soybeans and Black Sesame Seeds.

The RFIC system eliminated the required time and possible errors associated with manual eluent preparation and the method was shown to be accurate and reproducible for these two samples, and should be applicable to other food samples.

Phytic acid stores phosphate for many plants and is also a good metal chelator.

Because of its ability to bind iron and our inability to digest it, phytic acid was thought to have a negative nutritional impact (i.e., it could remove iron and other necessary metals from our body).

There is also evidence that phytic acid is an antioxidant that can prevent carcinogenesis and therefore has a positive health impact. Together, this makes phytic acid interesting to food scientists.

This application note and many others can be found at www.thermoscientific.com/dionex under the Documents tab.

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