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Behind the Science, S2-Ep1: Classic rock & HPLC with Pat McDonald

Video   Apr 15, 2017

 

Every good rock band starts in the basement. So that's where we're
heading ... to the basement of Waters to see the first chromatography
systems! Pat McDonald, corporate fellow emeritus at Waters, tells us
about Jim Waters and Waters Associates' inventions.

The first
commercial "high pressure" chromatography system for polymer chemists,
the GPC-100, from 1963. The ALC-100, developed in late 1970 for
separating isomers in the synthesis of B12. The M6000 pump that came in
1972, followed by the U6K injector, the first commercial "small"
particle columns (10 µm!). Bringing those pieces into an assembly led to
the first modern "high performance" liquid chromatography instrument,
now known as HPLC.

Read up on the history of Jim Waters and his chromatography people: http://bit.ly/2mwT2BI

 
Company Information
 
 
 

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