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Major advancements in the elemental analysis of sulfide ores and concentrates

Webinar

 
Major advancements in the elemental analysis of sulfide ores and concentrates
 

Traditionally most accurate analysis of sulfide concentrates of Cu, Zn, Pb, Mo and Ni is done by “wet chemistry” which is long in time and only provides result of one analyte at the time. This webinar shows that precise and accurate analysis of sulfidic-base concentrates could also be done with XRF technique in much shorter time and providing simultaneous results of all major and minor elements in the sample.

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Summary
Date: November 15 2018 - November 15 2018
Time:
10:30 - 11:30
(GMT-05:00) Eastern [US & Canada]
Event type:
Webinar - Live
Language:
English

Speakers

Alexander Komelkov M.Sc.
Alexander Komelkov. M.Sc. in Physics (Specialization: Spectrochemical analysis and XRF)
Is currently an Application specialist XRF @ Malvern Panalytical, NL. Specialization in mining and metal-processing XRF applications. Fused beads sample preparation. he was previously an Engineer-researcher and  lab manager @ Mining lab, Rwanda working on analysis of geological and mining materials with XRF and wet-chemical methods. From 1996 – 1998 he was an Engineer-researcher @ spectrochemical lab of Ulba Metallurgical Plant, Kazakhstan working with analysis of metals and slags with ICP-OES, atomic-emission and atomic absorption spectrometry. From 1994 – 1996 He was a Lab assistant @ spectrochemical lab of Ulba Metallurgical Plant.

Marco van der Haar - Malvern Panalytical
Co-presenter

More information
Who should attend?
All specialist involved in the exploration, production and analysis of ore concentrates of Cu, Zn, Pb, Mo and Ni concentrates: Lab managers, Analytical chemists, R+D chemists, R+D specialists or engineers, Process engineers, Quality control specialists.

Why attend?
Learn that XRF could be a cheaper and faster alternative of chemical methods.

 
 
 
 

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