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Choosing Sugar-free Fizzy Drink Doesn't Necessarily Help
News

Choosing Sugar-free Fizzy Drink Doesn't Necessarily Help

Choosing Sugar-free Fizzy Drink Doesn't Necessarily Help
News

Choosing Sugar-free Fizzy Drink Doesn't Necessarily Help

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A new study coordinated by researchers from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) examined the association between total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink consumption and subsequent total and cause-specific mortality.

The study included data from more than 450 000 people in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, with an average follow-up period of more than 16 years. Compared with participants who drank less than one glass of sugar-sweetened or artificially sweetened soft drinks per month, participants who drank two or more glasses of these drinks per day had a higher risk of all-cause mortality.

In addition, consumption of two or more glasses of artificially sweetened soft drinks per day was found to be positively associated with deaths from circulatory diseases, and consumption of one or more glasses of sugar-sweetened soft drinks per day was found to be positively associated with deaths from digestive diseases.

Reference
Association Between Soft Drink Consumption and Mortality in 10 European Countries. Amy Mullee et al. JAMA Intern Med. Published online September 3, 2019. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2478.

This article has been republished from the following materials. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

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