Clear lakes disguise impaired water quality

News   Oct 13, 2017 | Original Story from the University of Minnesota

 
Clear lakes disguise impaired water quality

Aerial view of a small lake near the city of Clear Lake, Iowa, which represents typical landscapes surrounding the lakes in this study. About 92 percent of land within Iowa is in production agriculture and crops on these lands receive large amendments of nitrogen as anhydrous ammonia and phosphorus. Excessive algae growth caused by these nutrient inputs have turned many of the lakes in this region bright green. Surprisingly, a number of lakes in this study were clearer and appeared bluer than expected, yet are far from healthy. The study authors hypothesize that very high nitrogen levels, often >10 mg/L, suppress high chlorophyll (algae) concentrations. Credit: John A. Downing.

 
 
 

RELATED ARTICLES

Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy Gives Nanoscale Insights

News

Scientists and engineers dug into the mechanisms that degrade sample quality in liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LC-TEM). They developed an LC-TEM device that uses multiple windows and patterned features to explore the impacts of high-energy electron bombardment on nanoparticles and sensitive biological samples.

READ MORE

European Ash Epidemic From Just One or Two Spores

News

Europe’s ash dieback epidemic could have been caused by just one or two mushroom-like fruiting bodies of a fungal pathogen from Asia, according to research published today.

READ MORE

Environmental DNA Analysis Aids Wildlife Monitoring

News

When endangered killer whales swim through the sheltered waters of Puget Sound, they leave behind traces of “environmental DNA” that researchers can detect as much as two hours later, a new study has found.

READ MORE

 

Comments | 0 ADD COMMENT

Like what you just read? You can find similar content on the communities below.

Analysis & Separations

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE