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Graphene on Toast, Anyone?

News   Feb 20, 2018 | Original Story by Mike Williams for Rice University.

 
Graphene on Toast, Anyone?

Rice University scientists experimented with various materials to create highly conductive laser-induced graphene, a foamy variant of the one-atom-thick form of carbon. Graphene burned into food could be used as radio-frequency tags for tracking or sensors to warn if the food is contaminated, according to Rice chemist James Tour. Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University.

 
 
 

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