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Low and High-tech Solutions to a Watery Problem

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News

Low and High-tech Solutions to a Watery Problem

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A wife-husband team will present both high-tech and low-tech solutions for improving water security at this year’s American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Seattle on Sunday, Feb. 16. Northwestern University’s Sera Young and Julius Lucks come from different ends of the science spectrum but meet in the middle to provide critical new information to approach this global issue.

Lucks, associate professor of chemical and biological engineering in Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering and an internationally recognized leader in synthetic biology, is developing a new technology platform to allow individuals across the globe to monitor the quality of their water cheaply, quickly and easily. Lucks will discuss how advances made at Northwestern’s Center for Synthetic Biology are making these discoveries possible in his presentation “Rapid and Low-cost Technologies for Monitoring Water Quality in the Field.” 


In “A Simple Indicator of Global Household Water Experiences,” Young, associate professor of anthropology in Northwestern’s Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, will discuss the Household Water Insecurity Experiences Scale (HWISE.org), the first globally equivalent scale to measure experiences of household-level water access and use. Young led a large consortium of scholars in the development of the HWISE Scale, which permits comparisons across settings to quantify the social, political, health and economic consequences of household water insecurity. The HWISE Scale is already being used by scientists and governmental- and non-governmental organizations around the world, including the Gallup World Poll.

Reference
Presented at the AAAS Annual Meeting, Seattle, Feb 2020,  Session "Managing Water: New Tools for Sustainable Development” to be held from 3:30 to 5 p.m. (PST) on Sunday, Feb. 16, at the Washington State Convention Center.

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