We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Some Like it Hot - Including Tree Shrews!
News

Some Like it Hot - Including Tree Shrews!

Some Like it Hot - Including Tree Shrews!
News

Some Like it Hot - Including Tree Shrews!

Credit: MA Xiaofeng.
Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Some Like it Hot - Including Tree Shrews!"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Spicy foods elicit a pungent or hot and painful sensation that repels most mammals. However, the tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis), a species closely related to primates, seems to violate this rule of thumb. 

Researchers accidentally observed tree shrews directly and actively consuming chili peppers, despite the deep geographic isolation between the animal and the food. 


To understand this tolerance for spicy food, a research group led by Prof. LAI Ren from the Kunming Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences along with researchers from Zhejiang University performed genomic and functional analyses on the tree shrew and its TRPV1. 


The research revealed that a single point mutation in the tree shrew’s transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1, a polymodal nociceptor) ion channel (tsV1) lowers its sensitivity to capsaicinoids, thus enabling tree shrews’ unique feeding behavior regarding pungent plants. 


The experimental evidence suggests that strong selection for this residue in tsV1 might be driven by Piper boehmeriaefolium, a spicy plant that geographically overlaps with the tree shrew and produces Cap2, a capsaicin analog, in abundance. 


Therefore, researchers think that feeding adaptation to P. boehmeriaefolium is the most likely explanation for the fixation of this mutation by positive selection, thus allowing the tree shrew’s diet to expand. 


This study broadens understanding of the evolutionary and molecular mechanisms of pungency tolerance behavior.

This article has been republished from materials provided by the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

Reference
Molecular mechanism of the tree shrew’s insensitivity to spiciness. Yalan Han , Bowen Li , Ting-Ting Yin , Cheng Xu, Rose Ombati, Lei Luo, Yujie Xia, Lizhen Xu, Jie Zheng, Yaping Zhang, Fan Yang, Guo-Dong Wang, Shilong Yang , Ren Lai. PLOS Biology  July 12, 2018https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.2004921.

Advertisement