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Ultrathin Membranes Offer Improved Carbon Capture

News   Jul 15, 2020 | Original story from the International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (I2CNER), Kyushu University

 
Ultrathin Membranes Offer Improved Carbon Capture

Freestanding and mechanically strong nanomembranes composed of two polymeric layers demonstrated superior carbon dioxide separation from nitrogen. As revealed by the study the surface of the composite membrane played a crucial role to achieve the CO2 selectivity. The interface layer composed of the interpenetrated gutter layer (PDMS) and ultrathin selective layer (Pebax-1657) polymers was conveniently controlled by oxygen plasma treatment of PDMS. The discovery provides new insights on the materials performance in the region of nanoscale thicknesses. Credit: Roman Selyanchyn, I2CNER, Kyushu University

 
 
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