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Untapped Resource or Climate Threat?

News   Sep 23, 2019 | Original story from Kyushu University.

 
Untapped Resource or Climate Threat?

Researchers at Kyushu University have located a large gas reservoir below an axis of rifting based on an automated method for deriving seismic pressure wave velocity from seismic reflection data. The reservoir can be seen in this two-dimensional seismic velocity mapping, which spans a depth of about 3.5 km below sea level and a distance of about 6.5 km, as a dark-blue area of low velocity within green areas of higher velocity. Identification of the reservoir was possible because of the greatly enhanced resolution provided by the automated technique compared to the manual analysis methods used to date. Depending on the nature of the gas, which is likely mainly carbon dioxide, methane, or a mixture of the two, this reservoir found in the Okinawa Trough could be a potential natural resource or an environmental concern. Credit: Takeshi Tsuji, Kyushu University.

 
 
 

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