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Want To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint? Insect Proteins May Have the Answer
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Want To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint? Insect Proteins May Have the Answer

Want To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint? Insect Proteins May Have the Answer
News

Want To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint? Insect Proteins May Have the Answer

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Researchers at the University of Helsinki and LUT University have analysed the extent to which insect protein could help to reduce global warming associated with food consumption in Europe. They have especially focused on insect protein use and soybean-protein use in the production of broilers.

The results support previous research suggesting that insect protein has the greatest potential to reduce the food-related carbon footprints of European consumers, if edible insects – such as crickets, flies, and worms – are consumed directly or processed as food. Preparation methods include eating them fresh, or drying and processing them into flour for use in bread or pasta.


"Our results indeed suggest that it is more sustainable to use insect protein for food rather than to use it to replace soybean meal in animal feed. Yet we found that a shift to using low-value food industry side stream products – such as catering waste or by-products, for example, from fish processing – in insect production for chicken feed is key to decisively increasing the carbon footprint benefits of using insect protein over soybean meal protein," says Professor


All this is important and timely, because as a part of the current climate change debate, concerns have been raised over the increasing deforestation associated with the rapid expansion of global soybean cultivation, which is a major protein source for feeding livestock raised to be food for humans. 

Reference
Vauterin A et al. The potential of insect protein to reduce food-based carbon footprints in Europe: The case of broiler meat production. J Clean Prod. Volume 320, 20 October 2021, 128799. doi: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2021.128799

This article has been republished from the following materials. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.


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