We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Ecotoxicology Studies Optimized by Advanced Analytical Techniques
Product News

Ecotoxicology Studies Optimized by Advanced Analytical Techniques

Ecotoxicology Studies Optimized by Advanced Analytical Techniques
Product News

Ecotoxicology Studies Optimized by Advanced Analytical Techniques


Want a FREE PDF version of This Product News?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Ecotoxicology Studies Optimized by Advanced Analytical Techniques"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

The webinar discusses the advanced analytical approaches that are used to apply Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation with online UV-Visible and ICP-MS detectors to nano-geochemical systems in the SWAMP (Soils, Water, Air, Manures, and Plants) laboratory, at the University of Alberta, Canada.

The application of AF4-UV-ICPMS to nano-geochemical systems in water, soils and aquatic ecotoxicology is discussed. Nano-geochemical systems are composed of the interacting nanoscale particles (ca. 1–100 nm), which form the basis of geochemical systems. These particles and particle systems govern the transport and distribution of natural and anthropogenic metals, pollutants, and nutrients in aquatic environments, and play important roles controlling mineral formation, transformations/stability, and geochemical reactions.

Yet, our understanding of relationships between the properties and functioning of the nano-geochemical environment is limited by the lack of appropriate analytical techniques for its non-destructive separation and analysis.

Interest in the production and measurement of engineered nanomaterials has led to advances in analytical methods such as field-flow fractionation and ICP-MS, which are capable of separating and characterizing nanoparticle systems at the mesoscale (groups of particles with similar properties), and at the nanoscale (individual particles).

These technologies are thus now available for application to nano-geochemical systems; however, additional analytical methods must first be developed and standardized to allow the collection, storage and measurement of these particles and particle systems under conditions that are comparable across studies, and either minimize disruption to their natural condition or permit accurate extrapolation to their behavior and properties under in-situ conditions.

Advertisement